skip to main content

News and Announcements

The latest news and announcements related to the Department of Atmospheric Science appear below. In addition to these items, the department periodically produces a newsletter designed to keep everyone informed about what is happening in the Atmospheric Science Department. The College of Engineering also provides additional news and announcements.

FEBRUARY 25, 2017

Department grad students and staff participate in Little Shop of Physics Open House

Little Shop of Physics Open House

Department of Atmospheric Science graduate students and staff members participated in the Little Shop of Physics Open House on Saturday, Feb. 25.

The 26th annual open house featured over 350 hands-on science experiments for all ages, interactive presentations, and Bohemian science spectacles. Little Shop of Physics estimates roughly 8,500 visitors attended this amazing day of science outreach, the largest event to date for the Colorado State University campus. The community was treated to a variety of science activities all in one place. An "Exploring the Atmosphere" room featured a variety of activities that focused on weather and climate.

Thanks to the combined efforts of our ATS graduate students and staff members from ESMEI, CIRA, AAAR, and FORTCAST for making this event a success!

Little Shop of Physics Open House
Little Shop of Physics Open House

 

FEBRUARY 24, 2017

Ben Toms awarded first place for presentation at AMS annual meeting

Ben Toms

Ben Toms, advised by Sue van den Heever, was selected as a first place winner in the oral presentation category in the Environmental Information Processing Technologies Conference Student Competition. According to the award announcement, competition judges chose Toms' presentation, “Development of a Novel Road Ice Detection and Road Closure System: Modeling, Observations and Risk Communication,” from a field of "many, very high quality and professional Presentations so that it is a tribute to you in presenting you this Award."

Ben would like to thank the American Meteorological Society and Lockheed Martin for funding his travel to the conference. An early online release of a paper related to his presentation may be found in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology at http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0199.1.

 

FEBRUARY 10, 2017

9News report: CSU receives gift of weather radar system

CSU receives gift of weather radar system

Watch the report

 

JANUARY 27, 2017

Melissa Burt, Emily Fischer and Manda Adams receive AMS Special Award for Earth Science Women's Network

AMS Special Award for Earth Science Women's Network
From left: Melissa Burt, Emily Fischer and Manda Adams

Melissa Burt, Emily Fischer and Manda Adams were presented with the AMS Special Award for the Earth Science Women's Network at the 97th AMS Annual Meeting in Seattle. The award recognized ESWN's inspirational commitment to broadening the participation of women in the Earth Sciences and providing a supportive environment for peer mentoring and professional development.

AMS gave this statement with the award, "Having more women in science improves research outcomes and makes our economy stronger, while opening doors of opportunity and equity for women around the world."

All three women are ESWN board members.

 

JANUARY 20, 2017

Stephanie Henderson and Brandon Wolding selected for Outstanding Student Paper Awards

Brandon and Stephanie
Left: Brandon Wolding. Right: Stephanie Henderson meets R2D2 at the 2016 AGU Fall Meeting.

Stephanie Henderson and Brandon Wolding, both advised by Eric Maloney, were selected to receive Outstanding Student Paper Awards based on their presentations at the 2016 AGU Fall Meeting. This award is only granted to the top 5 percent of student participants.

The work Stephanie presented examines the influence of the Madden-Julian Oscillation on Northern Hemisphere atmospheric winter blocking. Brandon's study used the tropical weak temperature gradient balance to examine how changes in the moist thermodynamic structure of the tropics affect the Madden-Julian Oscillation in two simulations of the Superparameterized Community Earth System Model, one at pre-industrial levels of CO2 and one where CO2 levels have been quadrupled.

Congratulations, Stephanie and Brandon!

 

JANUARY 19, 2017

How do your ice crystals grow? NSF fellow chases fires to study clouds

Controlled burn at Konza Prairie Biological Station in Kansas.

When fires – accidental or controlled – burn across Colorado and surrounding states, billions of microscopic soot particles flutter into the atmosphere. If they rise high enough, and conditions are just right, these black carbon particles can trigger the formation of ice in clouds.

The composition and lifetime of clouds have major implications for weather and climate. Yet all the microphysics of how ice crystals form in clouds remain unclear, as do what sources – wildfires, dust storms or sea spray among them – contribute the most. Colorado State University atmospheric scientist Gregg Schill is seeking to isolate the relationship between clouds, and the black carbon from burning biomass. His goal: providing real data to help climate modelers predict critical climate effects in years to come.

Schill is a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Professor of Atmospheric Science Sonia Kreidenweis, and he works with Paul DeMott, a senior scientist in Kreidenweis’ group. Schill’s research is supported by the NSF Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship.

“We’re interested in measuring the specific contributions of black carbon to ice nucleating particles,” Schill said. “Ice nucleating particles have large implications for both precipitation and cloud radiative properties, and they form the basis for one of our largest uncertainties in the prediction of climate change.”

Source article

 

JANUARY 10, 2017

FORTCAST launches "What's Brewing in Weather & Climate" series

To kick off the new year, FORTCAST is introducing a series of talks titled "What's Brewing in Weather & Climate." The first talk features Colorado State Climatologist Nolan Doesken discussing "Colorado's Amazing Climate." Join us 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17, at Tap and Handle (upstairs) for an informal and interactive discussion on many aspects of Colorado's weather and climate.

The public is welcome to attend. Please RSVP by filling out this short form.

Arrive by 6:25 p.m. for a chance to win an NOAA weather radio. CSU students also can get $2 off drafts with their student ID.

Please email Dakota Smith at dakota@atmos.colostate.edu with any questions.

 

JANUARY 9, 2017

Associate Professor Michael Bell awarded Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Michael Bell

President Obama today named CSU Atmospheric Science Associate Professor Michael Bell as recipient of a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE award is the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. 102 recipients were named this year across all fields of science and engineering. Michael was nominated for this award by the Department of Defense.

You can read the White House announcement here.

Source article

December 12, 2016 Steven Brey receives Dietrich Award and Spark Student Presentation Award

Steven Brey with Dietrich Award

Congratulations to fall 2016 M.S. graduate Steven Brey for being selected as this year's winner of the David L. Dietrich Honorary Scholarship. The award was presented Dec. 1, 2016, by Assistant Professor Emily Fischer, Steven's advisor. This award, funded each year by Fort Collins-based Air Resource Specialists, Inc., is given in honor of retired ARS President David Dietrich. The award goes each year to a CSU student who has demonstrated outstanding ability in air quality research and education.

Steven also received the third place Spark Award for his presentation "There's the smoke, where's the fire? A regional analysis of which fires impact U.S. air quality based on a decade of HMS smoke data" at the second International Smoke Symposium in Long Beach, CA, Nov. 14-17. Click here to view Power Point Presentation

November 30, 2016 ATS M.S. Student, Karly Reimel, Attends GOES-R Launch

Karly Reimel Chengi Liu

Karly's thoughts on attending the launch: "Over the past year I have had the opportunity to create relationships with many professionals at Lockheed Martin as a result of my AMS Graduate Fellowship that was sponsored by Lockheed Martin. Through these relationships, I was given the unique opportunity to attend the launch of GOES-R and to take part in multiple events leading up to the launch. For example, I joined a group of Lockheed Martin employees in a STEM outreach event. We met with 5th and 6th graders at a local elementary school and taught them about GOES-R and its applications. I gave a presentation on lightning and how the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard GOES-R will be important for future work in atmospheric science. The students took great interest in learning about weather and asked many fantastic questions. We also helped the students create cup-anemometers out of recycled materials. It was incredible to see the joy on their faces as they successfully constructed their own weather instruments. After helping with the STEM event, I had the opportunity to see the GOES-R launch vehicle up close by attending a photo-op event.

The following day, I witnessed the launch from Kennedy’s Space Center in the Banana Bay area with my father. The Saturn V building was opened to the public, so prior to the launch of GOES-R we were able to go and marvel in the size and importance of this rocket to America’s quest to land on the Moon. The launch viewing area looked out over the bay and you could see the launch vehicle in the distance. Audio updates from the control center along with the countdown to launch were played over loud speakers. The initial launch time was set to 5:42PM EST. Due to various problems discovered while preparing for the launch, the launch time was pushed further and further back until it reached the final time in the launch window. You could feel the tension in the air as everyone waited to hear if we would be witnessing the launch that day. Thankfully no other problems were reported and GOES-R was successfully launched at 6:42PM EST. Witnessing this event was a truly indescribable experience. As the countdown reached one, the entire sky lit up and the rocket moved upward in a ball of light. I had almost forgotten that a launch makes sound until the sound waves came roaring through a while after the rocket had already become airborne. It was a surreal moment to realize that GOES-R was finally on its journey to geostationary orbit. Thankfully everything has gone as planned thus far and hopefully we will have new and exciting data to work with in the very near future. GOES-R data and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper will be used in my M.S. thesis research that I am doing with my co-advisors, Prof. Steven Rutledge and Dr. Steven Miller."

November 28, 2016 Prof. Emily Fischer, Making PROGRESS, Supporting Women in Geosciences

PROGRESS

In fall 2014, a professional development and mentoring network for undergraduate women studying geosciences, called PROGRESS, was launched at Colorado State University.

Supported by a $1.7 million National Science Foundation award, Emily Fischer, assistant professor of atmospheric science, and co-investigators from CSU, Colorado College and West Virginia University, welcomed their first group of students in 2015. PROGRESS (Promoting Geoscience Research, Education and Success) has since rolled out both on the Colorado Front Range and in the Carolinas. In October, Fischer and collaborators welcomed their second cohort of about 90 undergraduate women.

“We’re testing whether this type of program is sustainable in different regions, and whether this is a feasible model for undergraduate women,” Fischer said.

PROGRESS is inspired in part by the Earth Science Women’s Network, an international organization that provides career and community support for its 2,500 members in 50 countries. Its member base is primarily made up of graduate-level or higher women, however.

Fischer started PROGRESS with Melissa Burt, Diversity Initiatives Manager for the College of Engineering. They wanted to create a program that would open up valuable professional development opportunities to undergraduate women in the geosciences.

Along the Front Range, participating universities in PROGRESS are Colorado State University, University of Colorado Boulder, Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado College and University of Wyoming. Participating Carolinas universities are North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, North Carolina State University and University of South Carolina.

Building community with other women

PROGRESS begins with a weekend workshop that introduces participants to the environmental and earth sciences and shows them examples of diverse women working and succeeding in these fields. A focus of the program is mentoring, and students also learn about the value of mentoring and how to build networks. “Students really like the workshop, and for some, it’s this moment when they were kind of lost, or ready to change their major, but coming to the workshop provided a community and gave them the energy to realize that this is something they can do,” Fischer said.

During the weekend workshop, students are also paired with more senior women who serve as long-term mentors. Student-mentor pairs are encouraged to meet several times each semester, as well as attend PROGRESS-hosted networking events on each participating campus.

“Through mentoring, our goal is to provide students with support and positive affirmations, especially during their first semester,” Fischer said. Networking events are open to all PROGRESS participants and are meant to facilitate engaging, fulfilling, and overall meaningful relationships for students.

ESWN members pay it forward

Many of the women serving as PROGRESS mentors are also current members of ESWN. “We’re excited about creating this engaging, supportive, and comforting environment that we’ve been able to experience, but at a graduate level,” Fischer said. The women involved are inspired to give back to undergraduates because of the support they’ve experienced through ESWN.

ESWN members have also experienced firsthand the challenges of working in the geosciences, and hope that early exposure to the sciences will help undergraduate students realize these fields are societally relevant.

Though women continue to be largely underrepresented in the geosciences, the hope is that mentoring and community building can help close that gap. The effort follows a decade of successful diversity-related efforts in the Department of Atmospheric Science.

Interested in becoming involved with PROGRESS, either as a mentor or a participant? Contact Emily Fischer at Emily.V.Fischer (at) colostate.edu.
Additional resources for women interested in the earth and environmental sciences are available on the PROGRESS website.

Source Article

November 18, 2016 Prof. Jeff Pierce's group demonstrates how seabirds impact Arctic aerosols and climate

Seabirds perched on rock

It turns out bird poop helps cool the Arctic.

That’s according to new research from Colorado State University atmospheric scientists, who are working to better understand key components of Arctic climate systems.

Publishing in Nature Communications and featured by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Associate Professor of Atmospheric Science Jeff Pierce and graduate student Jack Kodros present evidence linking ammonia emissions from summertime Arctic seabird-colony excrement, called guano, to newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles. These particles can in turn influence Arctic cloud properties and their effects on climate.

Clouds and climate

Clouds play a key role in modulating Arctic temperature; thus, understanding factors that influence clouds is essential, Pierce says. Central to the development of clouds is the availability of cloud condensation nuclei – small atmospheric particles around which water can condense.

Using a combination of observations and computer modeling, Pierce, Kodros and co-authors at Dalhousie University, University of Toronto, and Environment and Climate Change Canada determined that migratory-seabird colonies have a definitive influence on atmospheric particles and clouds in the pristine summertime Arctic.

They report the presence of summertime bursts of atmospheric particles linked to ammonia emissions from seabird-colony guano. These particles can spread throughout the Arctic, fostering cloud-droplet formation, and in turn reflect sunlight back to space for a net cooling effect.

“This newly identified and fascinating ecological-atmospheric connection highlights the interconnectedness of the many components of Earth’s climate system,” Pierce said.

Source Article

November 14, 2016 CSU Cans Around the Oval Wraps Up Donations

Thank you all very much for your participation in this year’s Cans Around the Oval Food Drive! All told, the university collected 41,670 pounds of food and $57,714 in cash donations to feed hungry families in Larimer County. As a department, ATS collected 72 pounds of food and $415, for a total “impact factor” of 2,147 pounds! Your generosity is much appreciated! - FORTCAST Executive Board.

Cans Around the Oval Award Certificate

November 10, 2016 ATS and CIRA make strong showing in College of Engineering awards

Steve Miller, Libby Barnes, and Jeff Collett

ATS and CIRA made a strong showing at the Nov. 10 College of Engineering awards ceremony. From left to right: ATS alum and CIRA Associate Director Dr. Steve Miller received the Outstanding Administrative Professional Staff Research Award. Prof. Libby Barnes was recognized with the COE Abell Outstanding Early-Career Faculty Award. Department Head and Prof. Jeff Collett received the Abell Outstanding Research Faculty Award.

November 9, 2016 Sjostrom Family and Shrake-Culler scholarships awarded to Zitely Tzompa and Chengji Liu

Zitely Tzompa Chengi Liu

Zitely Tzompa and Chengji Liu have been selected to receive, respectively, the Sjostrom Family Scholarship and the Shrake-Culler Scholarship.

The Sjostrom Family Scholarship is awarded annually to a graduate student in a CSU College of Engineering Department. This year applications were invited from ATS students. Preference is given to students who have a demonstrated research and/or professional interest in improving the quality of life in less industrialized communities.

The Shrake-Culler Scholarship is awarded annually to an ATS PhD student. Students are selected based on a strong research and academic record and demonstration of a strong work ethic and enthusiasm for higher education.

Congratulations to Zitely and Chengji on their selection for these awards!

November 5, 2016 Friends, Colleagues and Family Celebrate University Distinguished Professor Emeritus Tom Vonder Haar’s Retirement

Prof. Vonder Haar receives retirement gift Vonder Haar Retirement Celebration

Friends, Colleagues and Family celebrated University Distinguished Professor Emeritus Tom Vonder Haar’s retirement on September 10, 2016. Prof. Emeritus Vonder Haar served on the ATS faculty for 46 years, including as Department Head (1974-84) and Founding Director of CIRA (1980-2008). He has enjoyed advising approximately 30 PhD and 100 MS graduates from the Department. More information on Prof. Emeritus Vonder Haar’s distinguished career may be viewed on his website.

November 1, 2016 Professors Sue van den Heever and Eric Maloney Receive 2016 Atmospheric Sciences Ascent Award

Sue van den Heever Eric Maloney

Two CSU ATS faculty members were recently announced as winners of the 2016 Ascent Award from the Atmospheric Science section of the American Geophysical Union. The awards will be presented at the AGU fall meeting, to be held 12–16 December in San Francisco, CA.

Monfort Professor Sue van den Heever was selected for this distinguished recognition by AGU for fundamental advances to our understanding of the influence of microphysical processes on atmospheric convection, and feedback processes.

Professor Eric Maloney was selected for this distinguished recognition by AGU for fundamental studies enhancing the understanding of the Madden and Julian Oscillations, and their impacts on a wide range of tropical phenomena including tropical cyclones.

The Ascent award recognizes exceptional research and professional leadership by mid-career scientists working in the atmospheric and climate sciences.  Five Ascent award winners were named this year: three from the U.S., one from England, and one from Australia.  The award announcement was made in the October AGU publication, EOS.

Congratulations Profs. van den Heever and Maloney on this outstanding achievement!

More information: ARM/ASR Veteran Researchers Win American Geophysical Union Ascent Awards

Citation: AGU (2016), Hall, Jakob, Maloney, Scaife, and Van den Heever receive 2016 Atmospheric Sciences Ascent Award, Eos, 97, doi:10.1029/2016EO060625. Published on 10 October 2016.

October 10, 2016 The 2016-2017 MAC Student Travel Award Recipients Announced

2016 MAC Student Travel Award Recipients
Pictured L to R: Aryeh Drager, Veljko Petkovic, Dakota Smith, Bryan Mundhenk, Ali Akherati, Marie McGraw, and Peter Marinescu

The MAC Student Travel funding committee is pleased to announce the following winners of the 2016-2017 MAC Student Travel Awards:

Student Advisor Conference
Ali Akherati Shantanu Jathar Mech. Eng. American Association for Aerosol Research
Aryeh Drager Sue van den Heever AMS 17th Conference of Mesoscale Processes
Peter Marinescu Sue van den Heever and Sonia Kreidenweis 2017 Aerosol, Clouds, Precipitation and Climate Working Group Meeting
Marie McGraw Elizabeth Barnes AMS 21st Conference on Atmospheric and Ocean Fluid Dynamics
Bryan Mundhenk Elizabeth Barnes and Eric Maloney Sub-Seasonal to Seasonal Predictability of Extreme Weather and Climate Workshop
Veljko Petkovic Christian Kummerow NASA’s Precipitation Measurements Missions Science Program Team Meeting
Dakota Smith Scott Denning 97th American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting

The MAC Student Travel Awards are supported by the MAC Foundation in Fort Collins, CO, where ATS Emeritus Professor, Thomas McKee, serves as a Foundation Trustee. The MAC Foundation provided a generous donation to the ATS department to support student travel to attend and present at conferences and meetings related to atmospheric science.

October 4, 2016 Prof. Tom Vonder Haar Selected as an Honorary Member of the American Meteorological Society

Tom Vonder Haar

University Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Tom Vonder Haar, has been selected as an Honorary Member of the American Meteorological Society. Tom will be recognized at the AMS annual meeting in Seattle in January. Honorary Member is a special title reserved for those "persons of acknowledged preeminence in the atmospheric or related oceanic or hydrologic sciences." According to the AMS, "Fellows should have made outstanding contributions . . . during a substantial number of years. Honorary Membership is meant to delineate and to acknowledge a rarer distinction, comparable to or exceeding that demanded by the Society’s highest awards."

Tom's selection as AMS Honorary Member places him a select group of exceptionally distinguished individuals who have made exceptional contributions to the atmospheric and related sciences. Congratulations, Tom!

October 1, 2016 Welcome New ATS Faculty Michael Bell and Kristen Rasmussen!

Michael Bell Kristen Rasmussen

Professor Michael Bell joined the CSU Atmospheric Science faculty as an Associate Professor in August 2016.

Michael Bell received his B.S. in Applied Mathematics with a minor in Meteorology at Metropolitan State College of Denver in 2001. He completed his M.S. in 2006 from the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University and Ph.D. in Meteorology in 2010 from the Naval Post Graduate School. Michael was as Assistant Professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa from 2012 to 2016 prior to joining the CSU ATS faculty.

Michael Bell's primary interests are in tropical, mesoscale, and radar meteorology. A central focus of his research is studying the mesoscale structure and intensification of tropical cyclones throughout their life-cycle from genesis to extratropical transition. This research is accomplished through the collection and analysis of research quality observations from aircraft and Doppler radars, in conjunction with high-resolution numerical modeling. A significant component of his research effort is also aimed at improving mesoscale and radar analysis techniques and open source software tools.

Professor Kristen Rasmussen joined the CSU Atmospheric Science faculty as an Assistant Professor in October 2016.

Kristen Rasmussen received a B.S. in Meteorology and Mathematics and a B.A. in Music at the University of Miami in 2007. She completed her M.S. in 2011 and Ph.D. in 2014 from the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington. Her graduate research primarily focused on cloud and mesoscale processes of high-impact weather in South America using the TRMM satellite and flooding in India and Pakistan.  Kristen was an Advanced Study Program Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and worked with scientists from the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Lab (MMM) and Research Applications Lab (RAL) from 2015 to 2016.

Kristen Rasmussen’s primary research interests include investigating the global population of convective storms from the TRMM and GPM spaceborne precipitation radars, extreme deep convection in South America, flooding in Pakistan and India, mesoscale and cloud dynamics, hydrometeorology, cloud-climate interactions, high-impact weather, and convection-permitting regional climate modeling. She enjoys participating in field campaigns and has been involved in various campaigns around the world.

Since her early introduction to science as a young K-12 participant in the Colorado State Science Fair, which is held at CSU annually, Kristen is enthusiastic about returning to CSU where her early science career initially began.

September 14, 2016 Ilana Pollack Recieves 2016 Inspiring Women in STEM Award

Ilana Pollack

INSIGHT Into Diversity is proud to recognize women who are making a difference in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) with the 2016 Inspiring Women in STEM Award. These women work to inspire and encourage the next generation of young people to pursue STEM education and careers via teaching, mentoring, research, and groundbreaking discoveries and innovations. As scientists, researchers, educators, entrepreneurs, and university presidents and deans, they serve as role models to students and professionals alike, emboldening them to follow in their footsteps.

As coordinator for the Front Range (FR) program at Colorado State University since 2015, Ilana B. Pollack, PhD, spearheads the recruitment of undergraduate women from four colleges in Colorado and Wyoming and ensures that each FR student has access to in-person mentoring with female role models through networking events at each institution. She also makes herself available to answer and address students’ and mentors’ questions and concerns. Pollack coordinates the PROmoting Geoscience Research, Education, and Success (PROGRESS) program and the Analysis of Women’s Advancement, Retention, and Education in Science study — part of a five-year project funded by the National Science Foundation — to recruit and mentor undergraduate women in the geosciences through both formal and informal professional and peer mentoring. Via a Web platform she helped create, she ensures that PROGRESS participants have access to a variety of critical online resources: scholarship and research opportunities, information on graduate schools, peer networks, in-person mentors, and more. More information available at http://www.insightintodiversity.com/inspiring-women-in-stem-2016/ From: Inspiring Women in STEM | INSIGHT Into Diversity

August 27, 2016 Inaugural Atmos Olympics

ATS students, staff, and friends of the department participated in the first ever Atmos Olympics over the weekend, an event sponsored by FORTCAST, the local AMS chapter. Team Celsius and Team Fahrenheit competed against each other in basketball, trivia, volleyball, yard games, kickball, and a relay, with Team Fahrenheit ultimately prevailing. A big thank-you to all who participated and to FORTCAST for organizing this fun event!

August 25, 2016: ATS Department Picnic and Welcome to New Atmospheric Science Students

On August 25th, the Department of Atmospheric Science held its annual Department and New Student Picnic at Spring Canyon Park in Fort Collins. This year, we invited families to attend and had live music in addition to our staples of weather bingo, yard games and a BBQ feast. This year, as in the past, faculty were introduced and in turn, they introduced their new students to the department.

2016 New Graduate Students
Pictured L to R back row: Michael Cheeseman, Ben Toms, Naufal Razin, Jon Martinez, Bryn Ronalds, Mike Natoli, Kyle Nardi, Jennie Bukowski
L to R front row: Kai-Chih Tseng, Ting-yu Cha, Ellie Delap, Luke Davis, Emily Ramnarine, Kate O’Dell, Minnie Park*, Ben Trabing, Kyle Chudler *spring 2016 admission
Kids enjoying picnic
Kids enjoying the live music at the department picnic.
Families at Picnic
Families, students, and staff lined up for BBQ.

August 25, 2016: Assistant Professor Elizabeth Barnes Named Oustanding Professor of the Year

Elizabeth Barnes
Assistant Professor Elizabeth Barnes

Congratulations to Assistant Professor Elizabeth Barnes for her selection as 2016 ATS Outstanding Professor of the Year.  Libby's selection was announced at the ATS picnic by graduate student representative Peter Marinescu.  The Outstanding Professor award, selected by department graduate students, is awarded annually to an ATS faculty member for exemplary classroom teaching.

Congratulations, Libby!

August 19, 2016: Transfort Bus Route to Foothills Campus Starting August 22nd

Starting Monday, August 22nd, the Foothills Campus Transfort bus service route begins. The first bus of the day will depart the CSU Transit Center at 7:15am and will continue to leave once an hour until 6:15pm and will run along Mulberry, Laporte, and Overland Trail. More information regarding bus stops, the route, and times can be found at http://www.ridetransfort.com/img/site_specific/uploads/33.pdf

Bus service will run Monday through Friday when CSU classes are in session.

Bus Route 33
Bus Route Map

August 1, 2016: Ph.D. Candidate Marie McGraw's Paper Published and Honored as a "Research Spotlight" Article in Geophysical Research Letters

Marie McGraw
Marie McGraw

Ph.D. candidate Marie McGraw, a member of Assistant Professor Elizabeth Barnes, had a paper published and honored as a "Research Spotlight" article in Geophysical Research Letters, as well as in the AGU publication EOS.

The GRL paper, titled "Reconciling the observed and modeled Southern Hemisphere circulation response to volcanic eruptions", focuses on understanding the Southern Hemisphere circulation response to large volcanic eruptions. Observations of large volcanic eruptions are limited, with studies often finding seemingly contradictory results between models and observations. In this study, Marie, Professor Libby Barnes, and collaborator Clara Deser used over 200 model simulations to fully evaluate the Southern Hemisphere circulation response to volcanic eruptions. They found that while the model mean response does not match the observed responses, the variability of the circulation response is substantial enough to explain the observations, thus demonstrating that the seeming discrepancies between the modeled and observed responses can be explained in the context of climate variability.

The Department would like to congratulate Marie on this outstanding achievement!

July 26, 2016: University Distinguished Professor Emeritus Thomas H. Vonder Haar Selected as 2016 Fellow of the American Geophysical Union

Tom Vonder Haar
Thomas H. Vonder Haar

University Distinguished Professor Emeritus Tom Vonder Haar has been selected as a 2016 Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. This special honor recognizes scientific eminence in the Earth and space sciences and acknowledges Fellows for their remarkable contributions to their research fields, exceptional knowledge, and visionary leadership. Only 0.1% of AGU membership receives this recognition in any given year. Tom will be recognized at an awards dinner at the AGU meeting this December in San Francisco.

Congratulations, Tom!

 

National AGU ASCENT awards to ATS faculty Sue van den Heever and Eric Maloney

Two CSU ATS faculty members were just announced as winners of 2016 ASCENT awards from the Atmospheric Science section of the American Geophysical Union.  Monfort Professor Sue van den Heever and Professor Eric Maloney were each selected for this distinguished recognition by AGU.

The ASCENT award recognizes exceptional research and professional leadership by mid-career scientists working in the atmospheric and climate sciences.  Five ASCENT award winners were named this year: three from the U.S., one from England, and one from Australia.  The award announcement was made in EOS: https://eos.org/agu-news/2016-agu-section-and-focus-group-awardees-and-named-lecturers

Winners will receive their awards at the Atmospheric Science section dinner at the AGU meeting in December.

Congratulations to Sue and Eric on this outstanding achievement!

Sue van den Heever Eric Maloney

June 30, 2016: Leah Grant Receives NSF GROW Award

Leah Grant
Leah Grant

Leah Grant, Ph.D. student of Associate Professor Susan van den Heever, has been awarded the NSF GROW (Graduate Research Opportunities Worldwide) Award. This award, only open to NSF GRFP (Graduate Research Fellowship Program) recipients, awards the winner with support for a visit to an international institution to conduct research for 2 to 12 months during their Ph.D. program. Leah will be traveling to University of Melbourne in Australia this fall to work with Dr. Todd Lane. They will investigate how changes to cold pool strengths alter characteristics of tropical convective systems in RCE, such as the convective systems' movement, lifetime, and intensity. Dr. Lane is an expert in tropical convection, coupling of atmospheric waves and convection, and mesoscale dynamics, among others.

Leah is currently investigating how convective thunderstorms and small-scale processes such as microphysics, turbulence, and surface energy fluxes interact and influence one another, using numerical modeling. Some work she has already completed toward her PhD involved studying the interaction between cold pools - pools of negatively buoyant air created by precipitation evaporation and melting - and surface energy fluxes, and how this interaction changes as the cold pool evolves. She is extending this work to other environments including dry continental, tropical continental, and oceanic. She is also studying topics related to tropical convective storms in simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE), an idealized state that is commonly used to approximate the tropical atmosphere.

Congratulations, Leah, on this outstanding achievement!

June 17, 2016: In Memory of Dr. Elmar R. Reiter, Professor Emeritus (February 22, 1928 – June 17, 2016)

Elmar Reiter
Dr. Elmar R. Reiter, Professor Emeritus

Dr. Elmar Rudolf Reiter, 88, passed away on June 17th, 2016 in Peoria, AZ. He is survived by his spouse Gabriella Reiter, three children (Bernadette, Reinhold, and Christa-Maria), and six grandchildren. Dr. Elmar Reiter was Professor Emeritus from Colorado State University, where he helped found the Atmospheric Science Department. He was a brilliant scientist and inventor. He is best known for his work regarding “jet streams” which gave rise to the algorithms used by the airlines to determine the magnitude and direction of clear air turbulence. He was also a talented artist and tenor singer. He requested that there would be no memorial or funeral service. Instead, he wished that everyone that knew him celebrate his life. He was a scientist who contributed greatly to the advancement of climate models and weather prediction systems. The family asks that donations be given, in his memory, to scholarship funds that further scientific research at CSU school of Engineering and Atmospheric Science.

If you wish to contribute to the fund go to the Colorado State University (CSU) site link https://advancing.colostate.edu/DRELMARREITER or call (970) 491-7135 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. MT, or by e-mail to csugifts@csuf.colostate.edu.

Click here to see the obituary posted in the The Coloradoan.

June 14, 2016: Garfield County Air Quality Study Results Presented to Public

Brad Wells
M.S. '14 student Bradley Wells

Data from an extensive multi-year Colorado State University study of air emissions from natural gas operations in Garfield County, Colorado have been presented publicly by a CSU research team.

Study leader Jeffrey Collett, professor and head of CSU’s Department of Atmospheric Science, presented the study results during a session of the Garfield County Board of Commissioners June 14. The presentation was streamed live and is archived on the Garfield County government website. Read the county’s news release.

The study, Characterizing Air Emissions from Natural Gas Drilling and Well Completion Operations in Garfield County, Colorado, was commissioned in 2012 by Garfield County. It was aimed at characterizing the extent of air emissions from natural gas extraction activities.

To continue reading about this study and the results presented, please read the CSU SOURCE article written by Anne Ju Manning published on June 14, 2016.

June 3, 2016: Brandon Wolding Selected to be a SoGES Sustainability Leadership Fellow

BrandonWolding
Brandon Wolding

Brandon Wolding, a Ph.D. student in Professor Eric Maloney's group, has been selected to be a 2016-2017 School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SoGES) Sustainability Leadership Fellow.

SoGES Sustainability Leadership Fellows are a select group of leading CSU senior Ph.D. candidates and Postdoctoral Fellows interested in communicating their science to media and the public. Over the course of one year, these fellows receive state-of-the-art training in environmental communication and professional development skills. Fellows are selected on a competitive basis, including their current sustainability science research and their interest in communicating important scientific concepts to broad audiences.

Brandon studies a tropical phenomena known as the Madden-Julian Oscillation. His current work seeks to improve our understanding of feedbacks between convective heating and moisture, and to anticipate how such feedbacks may change as our climate system warms. Brandon is very grateful to have the opportunity to study such an interesting problem, and to be surrounded by the talented and supportive research community at Colorado State University. He loves his job!

Congratulations, Brandon, on this outstanding achievement!

To see a list of all the 2016-2017 SoGES Sustainability Leadership Fellows, please see the CSU SOURCE article here.

May 23, 2016: Remembering Dr. Gray

Thank you to everyone who came to the Department's gathering to remember Dr. Gray, to those who shared stories and remembrances, and to Bill's children who were in attendance. Dr. Gray will be greatly missed.

To view the page devoted to Dr. Gray's career and accomplishments written by Professor Emeritus Wayne Schubert, please click here.

Comments, condolences, and stories in memory of Bill Gray may be sent to Katherine Oldberg to be shared on the ATS website. Submissions may be viewed here.

May 23, 2016: Welcome ESMEI's Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) 2016 Interns!

Summer is a very busy time of the year at the Earth System Modeling and Education Institute (ESMEI), the institutional legacy of CMMAP, for many reasons. One of which is the the much anticipated arrival of the summer interns. ESMEI offers paid summer undergraduate research internships at Colorado State University in the Department of Atmospheric Science. Interns participate in a 10 week program from late May through July. This is an exciting research opportunity in beautiful Fort Collins, Colorado where they join world-class atmospheric scientists investigating the science of clouds, climate and climate change, weather, and modeling. During the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program interns have the opportunity to attend scientific seminars, visit national scientific laboratories, and participate in a variety of professional development training.

REU interns
L-R, Front Row: Kevin Zolea (Kean University), Ann Casey Hughes (Wofford College), Rachel Phinney (University of Nebraska Lincoln), Rachael Coons (SUNY Albany)
L-R, Back Row: Maryssa Loehr (Missouri University of Science and Technology), Steven Cavazos (University of the Incarnate Word), Anna Miller (Reed College), Khalil McMillan(North Carolina A&T State University), Alexia Prosperi (Valparaiso University), Keenan Eure (University of Maryland at College Park)

May 17, 2016: ATS and CIRA Named CSU Program of Research and Scholarly Excellence

ATS Foothills Campus
Photo credit: Katherine Oldberg 04/25/2016

We are pleased to announce that the Department of Atmospheric Science and CIRA have been jointly designated as a CSU Program of Research and Scholarly Excellence (PRSE). Atmospheric Science has been repeatedly designated as a PRSE since the program's inception in 1991. CIRA and ATS were jointly designated in 2012 and have now been re-designated as a PRSE for the next four years.

PRSE selection is a competitive process open to programs across campus. This year's ATS/CIRA designation is the result of a successful proposal submitted earlier this year. Our selection reflects the many collective accomplishments of ATS and CIRA faculty, staff, and students - and our broader collaborators at CSU and beyond - over the past 5 years. PRSE designation comes with award of a graduate student fellowship from the Graduate School and an opportunity to compete for other funding from the office of the Vice President for Research.

Thanks to all that each of you do to make atmospheric science research and graduate education at CSU so successful. We look forward to continued synergy in the partnership between ATS and CIRA as we tackle the many compelling scientific challenges in our field.

-Professor and Department Head Jeff Collett and Professor and CIRA Director Chris Kummerow

May 13, 2016: Congratulations Spring 2016 Atmos Graduates!

Congratulations go out to our recent Department of Atmospheric Science Graduates and Ph.D. Candidates, several who walked in Commencement Ceremonies on Friday, May 13th.

The Department recognizes their dedication to science and research and is proud of their academic achievements. Graduation brings new and varied opportunities and there is no doubt that success awaits them in their future endeavors.

Spring 2016 Graduates M.S./Ph.D. Include:
Ali Boris*Ph.D.Adviser: Jeff Collett
Melissa BurtPh.D.Adviser: David Randall
Michal ClavnerPh.D.Adviser: Bill Cotton
Aryeh Drager*M.S.Adviser: Sue van den Heever
Peter GobleM.S.Adviser: Russ Schumacher
Alex Goodman*M.S.Adviser: David Randall
Greg HermanM.S.Adviser: Russ Schumacher
Noel Hilliard*M.S.Adviser: Jeff Collett
Leah Lindsey*M.S.Adviser: David Randall
Andy ManasterM.S.Adviser: Chris O'Dell/Chris Kummerow
Peter MarinescuM.S.Adviser: Sue van den Heever
Alex Naegele*M.S.Adviser: David Randall
Erik NielsenM.S.Adviser: Russ Schumacher
Amanda SheffieldPh.D.Adviser: Sue van den Heever
Doug StolzPh.D.Adviser: Steven Rutledge
Liz ThompsonPh.D.Adviser: Steven Rutledge
Jake ZaragozaM.S.Adviser: Emily Fischer

*Anticipated Graduation Summer 2016

Prior to commencement ceremonies, Graduates, Ph.D. Candidates, and their families were invited to a graduate luncheon with faculty.

Spring 2016 Graduates
Left to right: Noel Hilliard, Aryeh Drager, Melissa Burt, Ali Boris, Alex Naegele, Adele Igel, Erik Nielsen, Amanda Sheffield

May 9, 2016: ATS PhD student Yi Li leads new PNAS publication examining shifts in oxidized and reduced nitrogen deposition in U.S.

On May 9 recent Ph.D. graduate Yi Li, advised by Professor and Department Head Jeff Collett, published a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) entitled, "Increasing importance of deposition of reduced nitrogen in the United States".

It is unusual for a grad student to lead a paper in PNAS - congratulations Yi, on this outstanding achievement!

To read more about this high impact paper, please read the CSU SOURCE article, "Agricultural ammonia emissions disrupt earth’s delicate nitrogen balance" by Anne Ju Manning.

Yi Li PNAS Graphic

May 6, 2016: Dr. Thomas C. Peterson - Ph.D. '91 - Receives 2016 CSU Atmospheric Science Distinguished Alumni Award

Dr. Thomas C. Peterson (Tom) received the 2016 CSU Department of Atmospheric Science Distinguished Alumni Award by Department Head Jeff Collett on Friday, May 6. This award is presented to an outstanding alumnus and/or alumna who exemplifies core values revered by the Department including dedication to research, commitment to education, and leadership prowess in the atmospheric sciences. These values, exemplified throughout the course of Thomas' distinguished career, are the very reason he was chosen for this award.

Tom Peterson is the President of the World Meteorological Organization's Commission for Climatology. In 2004, Essential Science Indicators ranked him as one of the top 1% of scientists in the field of Geosciences based on Journal Citation Reports. He was a lead author on the Nobel Peace Prize winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report published in 2007. Foreign Policy Magazine named him one of the top 100 Leading Global Thinkers of 2013 for his work on Explaining Extreme Events from a Climate Perspective. In July Dr. Peterson retired from his position as Principal Scientist at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information.

In addition to receiving this award, Tom gave a special colloquium presentation, "The Story of Climate Data" during the award ceremony.

The Department would like to congratulate Tom on his career achievements and thank him for proudly representing CSU over the years.

And a big thank you and shout out to our student volunteers. We could not have had a successful year without you!

May 6, 2016: Jack Kodros and Leah Grant Receive Outstanding Department Honors at the Herbert Riehl Memorial Award/Alumni Award Ceremony

Congratulations goes out to M.S. student Jack Kodros and Ph.D. candidate Leah Grant for receiving distinguished honors this week at the annual CSU Department of Atmospheric Science Herbert Riehl Memorial Award/Alumni Ceremony held on Friday, May 6.

The 2016 Riehl Award for an outstanding paper based on MS research went to Jack Kodros. Jack, who is advised by Associate Professor Jeff Pierce, won for his recent Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics paper entitled Uncertainties in global aerosols and climate effects due to biofuel emissions. Jack was unable to attend the ceremony. We will look for an opportunity for Jack to present his paper in the near future.

The 2016 Alumni Award for an outstanding paper based on PhD research went to Leah Grant. Leah is advised by Associate Professor Sue van den Heever. She was recognized for her recent Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR) paper entitled Cold Pool Dissipation. Leah gave a great presentation which stimulated a great deal of discussion. Leah is now the 3rd ATS student to be selected for both the Riehl and Alumni student paper awards, following Angela Rowe and Adele Igel.

The granting of both of these awards is based on faculty nominations and a committee decision. The Herbert Riehl Memorial Award is awarded to a current Master's Degree candidate or a student in the Ph.D. program for less than one year. The student must have obtained their M.S. degree from our Department and have submitted a technical manuscript for publication during the previous eighteen-month period. The Alumni Award is given to a senior Ph.D. candidate who has passed the preliminary exam and has submitted at least one paper to the peer-reviewed literature based on their dissertation work.

The department would like to congratulate Jack and Leah again for their hard work and recognize them for their outstanding achievement.

April 27, 2016: Ben Toms Awarded 2016 American Meteorological Society Graduate Fellowship

Ben Toms
Ben Toms

Ben Toms, an incoming fall 2016 M.S. student in Associate Professor Susan van den Heever's group, has been awarded a 2016 American Meteorological Society Graduate Fellowship. The AMS Fellowship Program is a source of scholarships, useful resources, and unique opportunities for outstanding students looking to pursue graduate education in the atmospheric or related sciences. To date, 339 students have been designated as AMS fellowship recipients. The program helps these first-year graduate students to be educated about unique challenges facing the world so that they may better tackle these real-world issues after graduation. Fellowships come with several benefits that include financial support to maintain a full course load over their first year of graduate study, the opportunity to be special guests at the AMS Annual Meeting with exclusive events therein, ongoing academic and career advocation and support from AMS.

During Ben's undergraduate research activities, he developed a Python-based black ice prediction model for the state of Oklahoma and studied atmospheric gravity waves using ground based remote sensing instruments. Ben is currently working on a project studying the impacts of climate change on wildfire plume dispersion within the Intermountain West, and hopes to be able to apply some of this work to his research at the Department of Atmospheric Science. While not yet placed on a specific project within the van den Heever group, Ben hopes to work with aerosol interactions with convection and how that might play a role in extratropical cyclone development.
Congratulations, Ben!

April 20, 2016: Join Us for a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for the New GOES-R Antenna

GOES-R Antenna

Please join us on Monday, April 25, 2:30 p.m. for a ribbon cutting ceremony for the new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites – R Series (GOES-R) antenna. VPR Alan Rudolph, Dean McLean, Dept. Head Jeff Collett, Greg Mandt (GOES-R Program Manager) and Steve Goodman (GOES Program Scientist) will do the honors. There will be light refreshments in the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Building following the ribbon cutting.

From the GOES-R website:
The GOES-R is the next generation of geostationary weather satellites. There are four satellites in the series: GOES-R, GOES-S, GOES-T and GOES-U. The first satellite in the series, GOES-R, is scheduled for launch in October 2016. The GOES-R Series Program is a collaborative development and acquisition effort between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to develop, launch and operate the satellites.

The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere, total lightning data, and space weather monitoring to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data.

To read more about GOES-R, please visit the GOES-R website.

April 18, 2016: Save the date! Herbert Riehl, Alumni, and Outstanding Alumni Award Ceremony on May 6

Riehl Alumni Outstanding Save the Date

April 16, 2016: In Memory of Professor Emeritus William Gray

Bill Gray
Dr. Bill Gray

William Mason Gray (Bill) passed away peacefully surrounded by his family on April 16, 2016 at the age of 86. With his passing, the meteorological community has lost one of its most remarkable members. Bill was a faculty member in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University from 1961 until his retirement in 2005. His research made enormous contributions to the understanding of tropical cyclone structure, intensification, and climatology. During his long academic career Bill advised 70 masters and Ph.D. students, many of whom have become prominent leaders in the field of tropical meteorology.

To continue reading, please see the page devoted to Dr. Gray's career and accomplishments written by Professor Emeritus Wayne Schubert HERE.

Comments, condolences, and stories in memory of Bill Gray may be sent to Katherine Oldberg to be shared on the ATS website. Submissions may be viewed here.

April 6, 2016: CSU Atmospheric Science Professors Awarded EPA Grant to Study Wildfire Effects

Smoke Plume

Emissions of wildfire smoke and dust will likely increase over the western US with climate change. However, we don't know exactly how the climate will change. There are many possible futures. A team of researchers from the Department of Atmospheric Science (principal investigator Assistant Professor Emily Fischer) is going to propagate the uncertainty in future meteorology to an uncertainty in future smoke and dust concentrations. The team, which includes co-investigators Assistant Professor Jeffrey Pierce and Assistant Professor Elizabeth Barnes, along with Emily Fischer's M.S. student Steven Brey, has a goal to do this by EPA region, so that they can have a full view of the possible future air quality implications of more fires and dust storms in the future. Their research will be funded by a three-year, $350,000 grant awarded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

To read the CSU SOURCE article about this grant, "Smoke, dust and unknown future: CSU researchers to study wildfire effects", click here.

March 28, 2016: Zitely Tzompa Receives 2015 Rocky Mountain States Section of Air and Waste Management Association Scholarship

Zitely Tzompa
Zitely Tzompa

Ph.D. student Zitely Tzompa, a member of Assistant Professor Emily Fischer's group, was awarded a scholarship by the Rocky Mountain States Section of Air and Waste Management Association (RMSS-A&WMA). Along with the scholarship, Zitely will receive a one year student AWMA membership. The Air & Waste Management Association (A&WMA), a nonprofit organization, provides a forum for the exchange of information in a neutral forum. Its mission is to support professional development, networking, outreach and public information in more than 65 countries. A&WMA promotes global environmental responsibility and increases the effectiveness of organizations to make critical decisions that benefit society.

Zitely is investigating emissions of ethane from conventional and unconventional oil and natural gas extraction. The goal of this study is to update the global ethane budget based on the recent changes in emissions distributions caused by the massive growth of shale gas exploitation in North America. The ultimate goal of Zitely's research is to examine the regional lower tropospheric ozone enhancements due to the oil and natural gas industry emissions of these alkanes.

Congrats, Zitely!

March 15, 2016: Emily Riley Dellaripa Receives 2015 Editors' Citation for Excellence in Refereeing - JGR-Atmospheres

Emily Riley
Emily Riley Dellaripa

Emily Riley Dellaripa, a Post Doc with Associate Professor Susan van den Heever's group and Professor Eric Maloney's group, will receive the 2015 Editors' Citation for Excellence in Refereeing for JGR-Atmospheres. One of the most important services performed for AGU (American Geophysical Union) is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. The purpose of this citation is to express publicly the gratitude of AGU to those whose reviews have been particularly commendable. Emily's contributions to the journals program have been invaluable in maintaining a high quality standard. An announcement is planned for publication in a future issue of EOS (Earth & Space Science News).

Emily's research interests are in tropical meteorology with a focus on the Madden-Julian Oscillation, mesoscale organization and its role in multi-scale interactions, and convective initiation and growth. These interests are motivated by an overarching goal to better understand moist tropical convection and its role in larger-scale circulations. Observations, both space based and ground based, along with cloud resolving models are used in her research.

Congratulations, Emily!

March 4, 2016: FORTCAST to host Dr. Laura Sample McMeeking at their March Chapter Meeting

Dr. Laura Sample McMeeking
Dr. Laura Sample McMeeking

FORT Collins Atmospheric ScientisTs (FORTCAST) is hosting Dr. Laura Sample McMeeking for our March Chapter Meeting on Wednesday, March 30, 2016. This event is free and open to the public. Food and beverages will be provided.

Please RSVP if possible so FORTCAST can plan accordingly for food and beverages. To RSVP, click here.

Who: Dr. Laura Sample McMeeking
When: Wednesday, March 30, 2016, 6:30 pm
Where: Colorado State University, Behavioral Sciences Building, Room 103

BIO:
Laura Sample McMeeking is the Associate Director of the CSU STEM Center. From early in her life in Texas, Laura was fascinated with weather, which led her to Texas A&M for her undergraduate degree in Meteorology. It was during her undergraduate studies and later her graduate studies in atmospheric science at Colorado State University that Laura first became interested in not only how we study weather (or in her case atmospheric aerosols) but also how we talk about our research with others and teach them about our science. It was difficult not to think about how we communicate, having grown up in an extended family of attorneys and teachers. The many discussions Laura had with her family and friends prompted her to start asking questions about how people learn, and particularly how we, as scientists and educators, can get others as excited about weather and atmospheric science as we are. So, she successfully completed her PhD in Education Research at Colorado State and has since walked along the border of atmospheric science and education in her own research. Now, as well as being an administrator in the STEM Center, Dr. Sample McMeeking studies how teachers, undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty learn new knowledge and skills through professional development. Her research necessarily focuses on how different groups communicate to teach and learn from each other.

February 14, 2016: Dr. Eugene A. Mueller, radar pioneer, passes away

Dr. Eugene A. Mueller
Dr. Eugene A. Mueller

Dr. Eugene A. Mueller, one of the original engineers of the CHILL research weather radar system, passed away on 14 February, 2016. He made significant contributions to the field of radar meteorology over a span of four decades. At CSU Gene oversaw the continuing technical advancement of the radar (now known as CSU-CHILL). Notable radar improvements made at CSU included the adaptation of a dual transmitter configuration in which separate, identical transmitters were used to generate the horizontally and vertically polarized signals. Gene also developed the specifications for the custom-built dual polarization antenna that was acquired in 1994. He retired from his position as CSU-CHILL radar senior engineer in July 1995 and continued to live at his home in Loveland, Colorado.

Gene will be missed as both a mentor as well as a friend.

Please see the page devoted to Dr. Eugene A. Mueller's career and accomplishments written by Senior Research Associate Pat Kennedy and Professor Steven Rutledge HERE.

February 12, 2016: Karly Reimel Breaks CSU Women's Track Indoor Pole Vault Record, Twice

Karly Reimel
Karly Reimel

Karly Reimel, first year graduate student with Professor Rutledge's group, set a new Colorado State University Women's Track Indoor Pole Vault record, twice! Karly first broke the record on January 23, 2016 at the University of Nebraska at 3.93m (12'10.75"). A week later on January 30, 2016 at the University of New Mexico, she broke her own record at 4.05m (13'3.5"). Karly, who competed for three seasons at Florida State University, is using her last year of eligibility to compete for CSU. CSU sure likes her being on the team, for obvious reasons! For Karly's M.S., she is researching the relationship between lightning and severe weather in an attempt to better understand how lightning can be used to better predict the onset of severe weather.

Congratulations Karly!


To read more about Karly's records, read the following articles:
Reimel sets women's pole vault school record in Nebraska
Three school records propel women to second place finish at UNM

February 10, 2016: Department Head Jeff Collett appointed to serve on The USDA Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

Jeff Collett
Jeff Collett

Department Head Jeff Collett has been appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture to serve on The USDA Agricultural Air Quality Task Force. The task force, originally formed in 1996 at the direction of Congress, advises the Secretary of Agriculture on air quality and its relationship to agriculture based on sound scientific findings. Jeff will serve a 2 year term.

Congratulations Jeff!

To read the SOURCE article about this, click here.

February 4, 2016: Jakob Lindaas Receives an Outstanding Student Platform Presentation Award at the 2016 AMS Annual Meeting

Jakob Lindaas
Jakob Lindaas

Please join the department in congratulating M.S. student Jakob Lindaas, advised by Assistant Professor Emily Fischer, for receiving an Outstanding Student Platform Presentation Award at the recent 96th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting in New Orleans. Jakob's award was from the 18th AMS Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry for his presentation based on previous research at Harvard University.

Based on work Jakob did under the guidance of Professor Steve Wofsy and Dr. Roisin Commane at Harvard University, his talk entitled, "Empirical Estimates of Alaskan Net Ecosystem Exchange", aimed to answer the question: Is Alaska a net sink or source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere? Jakob and his colleagues used in situ CO2 data collected during 2012-2014 aboard the NASA C-23 Sherpa aircraft under the NASA Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) campaign. They used a data assimilation approach to constrain a simple biogenic model of the net flux, and determined that the biosphere of Alaska was a net source of carbon dioxide in 2013 and 2014, and was net neutral (neither a sink or a source) in 2012. Taking into account carbon dioxide emitted by humans and wildfires, Alaska becomes an even bigger source of CO2 in 2013 and 2014.

February 3, 2016: Peter Marinescu Receives an Outstanding Student Presentation Award at the 2016 AMS Annual Meeting

Peter Marinescu PECAN Project
Peter Marinescu

Congratulations to M.S. student Peter Marinescu, co-advised by Monfort Professor Sue van den Heever and University Distinguished Professor Sonia Kreidenweis, for receiving an Outstanding Student Presentation Award at the 96th Annual American Meteorological Society Meeting in New Orleans, LA. The title of Peter's presentation was "Impacts of Vertically Varying Aerosol Layers on MCS Cold Pool and Precipitation Processes" and was part of the Eighth Symposium on Aerosol–Cloud–Climate Interactions at the AMS meeting. In this presentation, Peter demonstrated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) that both aerosol particles in the lower troposphere and middle troposphere can impact the cloud microphysics and precipitation within the mesoscale convective systems.

Congrats, Peter!



January 7, 2016: Reception for Alumni, Faculty, Students, and Friends at the 96th AMS Meeting

AMS Save the Date

January 6, 2016: Leah Grant Receives an Outstanding Student Paper Award at the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting

Leah Grant's satellite image
Sahara desert MODIS true-color image

Please join the department in congratulating Monfort Professor Susan van den Heever's Ph.D. student Leah Grant for receiving an Outstanding Student Paper Award for her presentation on cold pools at the 2015 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting. Leah's talk, entitled "Cold Pool and Surface Flux Interactions in Different Environments", focused on a specific question: how do surface sensible heat fluxes impact evolution of convective cold pools? There are two main mechanisms for sensible heat fluxes to influence cold pools: by heating the cold pool directly and modifying its negative buoyancy; and by changing turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool. Leah and Monfort Professor van den Heever evaluated these two mechanisms using a suite of simulations of idealized, isolated cold pools. Their simulations were ideally representative of dry continental conditions that have large sensible heat fluxes, such as the cold pools over the Sahara desert in the MODIS true-color image.

Congratulations Leah on this outstanding achievement!


To see the full list of AGU's 2015 Outstanding Student Paper Awards, click here.

December 21, 2015: Senior Research Scientist Paul DeMott's Paper Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Paul DeMott

All over the planet, every day, oceans send plumes of sea spray into the atmosphere. Beyond the poetry of crashing ocean waves, this salt- and carbon-rich spray also has a dramatic effect on cloud formation and duration.

Yes, clouds, which cover 60 percent of the Earth's surface at any given time. In a new study, Sea spray aerosol as a unique source of ice nucleating particles, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, online Dec. 21, Colorado State University's Paul DeMott, a senior research scientist in the Department of Atmospheric Science, says sea spray is a unique, underappreciated source of what are called ice nucleating particles - microscopic bits that make their way into clouds and initiate the formation of ice, and in turn affect the composition and duration of clouds.

"The presence of these particles is critically important for precipitation and the lifetime of clouds, and consequently, for their radiative properties," said DeMott, who works in the lab of Sonia Kreidenweis, professor of atmospheric science, associate dean for research in the College of Engineering and a University Distinguished Professor.

Continue reading more about Paul's achievement in this CSU SOURCE Article here or in the National Science Foundation press release here.

Congratulations Paul!

December 7, 2016: Atmospheric Awards and Recognition Ceremony

On December 7th, the Department of Atmospheric Science held its annual Atmospheric Awards and Recognition Ceremony/Luncheon. Faculty and Staff Milestones, along with 2015 Student and Post Doctoral Fellowship and Scholarship Awards Winners were recognized.

We would like to take the time to congratulate all of our awards winners.

The committment of our students, post docs, faculty, researchers, and staff are invaluable and make our department a cohesive unit that strives for excellence not only in academics and research, but in public outreach as well.

Student Appointments, Awards, and Recognition
2015 1st Place AMS Conference on Mesoscale Processes James Ruppert
2015 2nd Place AMS Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry Aaron Pina
2015 3rd Place AMS Local Chapter Poster Contest FORTCAST
2015 AAAR Student Poster Award Jack Kodros
2015 AMS Best Student Poster CMMAP Intern Renee Duff
2015 AMS Outstanding Student Presentation Veljko Petkovic, David Henderson, Leah Grant, Brandon Wolding, Ashley Evanoski-Cole
2015 Best Poster Presentation Prize, 7th International GEOS-Chem Meeting Zitely Tzompa
Student Fellowships
AMS (American Meteorological Society) Samuel Childs, Sean Freeman, Jakob Lindaas, Karly Reimel, Richard Schulte
CIRA ATS Fellowship Karly Reimel
CMMAP Diversity Dakota Smith
CONACYT (Mexican National Council for Science and Technology) Zitley Tzompa
2015-2016 CSU International Presidential Fellow Liji David, Louis Rivoire
CSU Track and Field Karly Reimel
CSU University Distinguished Professors Scholarship Leah Grant
Dave Hart Athletic Scholarship Justin Whitaker
Dietrich Scholarship Jack Kodros
EPA Star Ashley Evanoski-Cole
Gates Millennium Isaac Medina
NREIP (Naval Research Enterprise Internship Program) Samuel Atwood
NSF Samuel Childs, Nick Davis, Aryeh Drager, Sean Freeman, Leah Grant, Adele Igel, Peter Marinescu, Eric Nielsen, Elizabeth Thompson
NSF Honorable Mention Steven Brey, Greg Herman
NSF Postdoctoral John Peters
PRSE (Programs of Research and Scholarly Excellence) Louis Rivoire
Shrake Culler David Duncan
SoGES (CSU Global Sustainability Leadership Fellow) Ashley Evanoski-Cole, Aaron Pina

November 24, 2015: Jack Kodros Receives the 2015 David L. Dietrich Honorary Scholarship

Jack Kodros Dietrich Award Ceremony

Congratulations to M.S. student Jack Kodros, advised by Assistant Professor Jeffrey Pierce, for being selected as this year's winner of the David L. Dietrich Honorary Scholarship. This $2500 award, funded each year by Fort Collins-based Air Resource Specialists, Inc., is given in honor of retired ARS President David Dietrich. The award goes each year to a CSU student who has demonstrated outstanding ability in air quality research and education.

November 21, 2015: David Duncan Selected for the 2015 Shrake-Culler Award

David Duncan
David Duncan

Congratulations to Atmospheric Science Ph.D. student David Duncan, advised by Professor Chris Kummerow, for receiving the Shrake Culler Scholarship. This award, presented by CSU's Department of Engineering, is granted to a senior Ph.D. student who demonstrates a passion for higher education, along with an outstanding work ethic and a successful academic record. David was nominated for this award by Chris Kummerow who spoke highly of his contributions to AMSR2 and his resulting selection to serve on an external review panel for the Global Hydrology Research Center at MSFC. David works on algorithm development for the GMI and AMSR2 satellite sensors, improving retrieval of water vapor, wind, and cloud water over ocean. The department is proud of his accomplishments and wishes him continued success as he progresses in his academic career at CSU.

November 5, 2015: Shannon Irey Receives College of Engineering Award: Outstanding Administrative Professional

Shannon Irey with the Dean
Dean McLean and Shannon Irey

The recipients of nine college awards were announced during the all-college meeting on Tuesday, November 3rd. Department of Atmospheric Science Research Project Manager Shannon Irey received the Outstanding Staff Award, Administrative Professional. Shannon is responsible for two of the largest research programs. She plays a critical role in helping ATS faculty manage budgets, prepare research proposals and submissions, analysis of financial and staffing needs, and much more. Shannon has done superb work in every aspect of her job, catalyzing these successful research programs.

Congratulations Shannon, on this well-deserved award!

November 4, 2015: American Meteorological Society Awards Fellowships to Five Dept. of Atmospheric Science Students

AMS Recipients
AMS fellowship award winners, L to R: Jakob Lindaas, Samuel Childs, Sean Freeman, Karly Reimel, and Rick Schulte

Five students in Colorado State University's Department of Atmospheric Science have received 2015 American Meteorological Society Graduate Fellowships. The CSU students were awarded five of nine total nationwide fellowships. Fellowship recipients are selected for academic excellence, community involvement, volunteer efforts, and future career plans in the sciences.

"The department is extremely proud of the accomplishments of these five individuals and of all of our graduate students," said Jeff Collett, Department of Atmospheric Science Professor and Department Head. "The fact that five of nine national AMS Graduate Fellowship winners this year are attending CSU clearly attests to the outstanding students that choose CSU for their graduate studies."

Collett continued: "In addition to these AMS Fellowships, many of our new and continuing students have also been recognized with graduate fellowships from a variety of sponsors, including nine recipients of highly prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships. Such exceptional students are key contributors to our program's success and international reputation."

The five recipients are:
Samuel ChildsM.S.Advisor:Russ Schumacher
Sean FreemanM.S.Advisor:Sue van den Heever
Jakob LindaasM.S.Advisor:Emily Fischer
Karly ReimelM.S.Advisor:Steven Rutledge/Steven Miller
Rick SchulteM.S.AdvisorChris Kummerow

Congratulations Jakob, Samuel, Sean, Karly, and Rick, on this outstanding achievement!

See the CSU SOURCE article highlighting this story here.

October 22, 2015: PROGRESS (PROmoting Geoscience Research Education and SuccesS)

PROGRESS workshop attendees
PROGRESS Workshop Attendees

Society needs women in science and technology! As part of an National Science Foundation funded program focused on recruiting and retaining women in the geosciences, Assistant Professor Emily Fischer hosted the first PROGRESS (Promoting Geoscience Education Research and Success) workshop. More than 50 students from the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, Colorado College, and University of Wyoming attended the workshop held in Estes Park on October 10th and 11th. Through a range of activities at the workshop, students were introduced to the geoscience fields, they met peers with similar interests across the Front Range, and they learned about their personal strengths. From here students will take part in an informal mentoring program with scientists across the Front Range. You can learn more about the program by visiting the new web portal: http://geosciencewomen.org/.

October 14, 2015: University Distinguished Professor Sonia Kreidenweis Receives the 2015 David Sinclair Award

Sonia at David Sinclair Award Ceremony
University Distinguished Professor Sonia Kreidenweis

University Distinguished Professor Sonia Kreidenweis has been selected as the 2015 recipient of the David Sinclair Awardfrom the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR). Sonia is a past President of AAAR, as well as a Fellow. The award was presented in October at the AAAR annual meeting in Minneapolis.

The David Sinclair Award recognizes sustained excellence in aerosol research and technology by an established scientist still active in his/her career. Sonia is being recognized for her many distinguished achievements in aerosol science, including high impact contributions concerning aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei, heterogeneous ice nucleation, aerosol impacts on visibility, and the emission and evolution of smoke from wild and prescribed fires.

Congratulations Sonia on this outstanding achievement!


October 9, 2015: 5th Annual Young Scientist Symposium on Atmospheric Research

Colorado State University's American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) Student Chapter and the FORT Collins Atmospheric ScientisTs (FORTCAST) AMS Local Chapter held the 5th Annual Young Scientist Symposium on Atmospheric Research (YSSAR) at the Department of Atmospheric Science on Friday, October 9. All graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and research scientists from across the Front Range who are working in meteorology, atmospheric science, and allied fields were welcome. The topics in the symposium included, but were not limited to:

  • Atmospheric chemistry and aerosols
  • Atmospheric dynamics
  • Climate and climate modeling
  • Cloud physics
  • Environmental health and air quality
  • Land-ocean-atmosphere interactions
  • Mesoscale meteorology
  • Remote sensing
  • Tropical Meteorology
  • See the schedule of events here.

    Bill Murtagh
    Keynote Address Speaker Bill Murtagh, White House
    Bill Murtagh Keynote Address

    October 4, 2015: SEA-POL: Advanced Ship-based Radar for Open-ocean Atmospheric Research

    Steven Rutledge
    Professor Steven Rutledge

    Directed by Department of Atmospheric Science Professor Steven Rutledge (Principal Investigator) and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor V. "Chandra" Chandrasekar (Co-Principal Investigator), this $1.3 million award from the National Science Foundation will develop an advanced ship-based radar to study clouds and precipitation over the oceans. This state-of-the-art polarimetric Doppler radar is known as SEA-POL, and employ dual-polarization technology, where both horizontal and vertically polarized radar signals are transmitted and received by the radar. This technology was pioneered at the university's CSU-CHILL National Radar Facility, also directed by Professor Rutledge. The polarization technology improves rainfall estimation and provides information on the distribution of liquid and ice particles in clouds. This information, which is vital to improving understanding of the global water cycle, air-sea interaction, and validating computer models of global precipitation, is the same technology used on the national radar network to detect severe weather.

    SEA-POL will be deployed periodically on U.S. -operated world-class research ships on several month-long cruises to various areas of the world's oceans. With seventy-five percent of the world's rainfall occurring over oceans, studying oceanic storms and measuring rainfall they produce with SEA-POL will allow scientists to better understand how tropical clouds and storms contribute to climate change. When SEA-POL is not deployed at sea, it will operate at Colorado State University for research and education.

    See the CSU SOURCE article about SEA-POL here.

    September 29, 2015: 2015 AMS Jule G. Charney Award Goes to Emeritus Professor Wayne Schubert

    Wayne Schubert
    Emeritus Professor Wayne Schubert

    Emeritus Professor Wayne Schubert was chosen as the recipient of the 2015 Jule G. Charney Award for landmark advances in theoretical understanding of convective parameterization, marine stratocumulus, balanced atmospheric flows, and tropical cyclone intensity and structure. The Charney Award is one of the highest awards of the American Meteorological Society(AMS). Wayne will receive the award at the AMS Annual Meeting in New Orleans in January.

    Congratulations Wayne!


    September 28, 2015: 2015 AMS President, Alexander MacDonald, Will Speak at the Next FORTCAST Chapter Meeting

    Sandy MacDonald
    2015 AMS President Sandy MacDonald

    2015 American Meteorological Society (AMS) President Alexander (Sandy) MacDonald will speak at the upcoming FORT Collins Atmospheric ScientisTs (FORTCAST) Local Chapter Meeting. Sandy will give a talk on "Science as our Protector". The next chapter meeting is scheduled for Thursday, October 8 at 6:30 pm in room 107 of the Behavioral Sciences Building on CSU's main campus. This event is free and open to the public. Food and beverages will be provided.

    Who: Sandy MacDonald, 2015 AMS President
    What: "Science as our Protector"
    When: Thursday, October 8 at 6:30 pm
    Where: Room 107 at the Behavioral Sciences Building at Colorado State University

    Please RSVP if possible. RSVP here or visit FORTCAST's website for more details.

    Abstract
    Science is not a passive bystander in our lives. It is our protector through the generations. I illustrate this talk with examples of the role of science as it has affected six generations of my own family. Our science protects people in many ways, from forecasting floods and hurricanes, to determining the threat of anthropogenic climate change. I will give examples of some of the possible environmental catastrophes of the 21st century, and how Earth system science could lead to favorable outcomes - or not. We have been given powerful tools; global observing, advanced computing and models, profound understanding of how the Earth system works. Success is not a given - it depends on how effective we are in science, technology, and the larger political sphere.

    August 28, 2015: Associate Professor Susan van den Heever Named Oustanding Professor of the Year

    Sue van den Heever
    Associate Professor Sue van den Heever

    Each year, one of the key highlights of the New Student Picnic is, of course, meeting the new students. The department warmly welcomed all 15 of them on August 28th and learned a little more about each of them through introductions by their professors. It is these same professors that held the key to the other eagerly awaited highlight of the picnic which was the announcement of the recipient of the Outstanding Professor of the Year Award. Each year, graduate student representatives poll department students on their thoughts regarding their interactions with faculty. After reviewing the results, one faculty member is chosen for the award based on a majority response.

    This year, as in last year's case with Professor Maloney, a repeat winner was announced. Associate Professor Susan van den Heever was named Outstanding Professor of the Year. This was Sue's 3rd time to be selected for the award - a record. Student comments about Sue included..."Professor van den Heever encouraged lively discussions in class, which really helped bring interesting ideas to the classroom and solidified cloud dynamics concepts"..."Sue creates a friendly and enjoyable atmosphere in the class. I looked forward to going to her class"..."She explains everything so clearly and her class was very organized".

    The department would like to congratulate Sue on this well deserved award!

    August 28, 2015: Welcome New Atmospheric Science Students

    On August 28th, the Department of Atmospheric Science held its annual New Student Picnic at Spring Canyon Park in Fort Collins. All Atmospheric Science Faculty, Students, Staff and Employees were invited to attend. This year, as in the past, faculty were introduced and in turn, they presented their new students to the department. In addition to this, the prestigious Outstanding Professor of the Year Award was presented to Associate Professor Susan van den Heever, general announcements were made, and the department then enjoyed an afternoon that included lunch and recreational activities. Bringing the department together for this event each year is beneficial, as it gives everyone the chance to interact and meet each other. It demonstrates the cohesiveness that exists in the department and ultimately is a great way to kickoff the upcoming school year.

    2015 Fall Class
    Pictured L to R back row: Louis Rivoire, Jakob Lindaas, Samuel Childs, Trenton Davis, Richard Schulte, Nathan Kelly
    L to R middle row: Derek Weber, Sean Freeman, Justin Whitaker
    L to R front row: Julie Barnum, Emily Bell, Andrea Jenney, Karly Reimel
    Not pictured: Jared Brewer, Kimberly Fewless, Stacey Hitchcock*

    *Spring 2015 Admission

    August 14, 2015: PhD Student Leah Grant Receives 2015 CSU University Distinguished Professors (UDP) Scholarship

    Leah Grant
    Leah Grant

    The Department of Atmospheric Science is pleased to announce PhD student Leah Grant, advised by Monfort Professor Sue van den Heever, has been selected as this year's recipient of the CSU University Distinguished Professors (UDP) scholarship. This major award is given each year to one graduate student at CSU. Leah was nominated and selected for this scholarship based on her outstanding graduate research record and potential for future leadership in our field.

    This major scholarship is funded each year by donations from CSU University Distinguished Professors. The University Distinguished Professors are a small group of faculty from across campus that have been recognized for exceptional scholarship. Three of the 17 current University Distinguished Professors are ATS faculty members: Professors Vonder Haar, Randall, and Kreidenweis. More information can be found here.

    Congratulations Leah!

    Update: September 8, 2015

    Read the CSU SOURCE article about the 2015 Colorado State University Distinguished Professors Scholarship highlighting Leah Grant, Grant receives University Distinguished Professors Scholarship, here.

    August 11, 2015: Christina McCluskey Awarded ASCENT Travel Grant

    Christina McCluskey in Ireland
    Christina McCluskey in Carna, Ireland

    The CSU Department of Atmospheric Science ASCENT (Assisting Students, Cultivating Excellence, Nurturing Talent) program was initiated in Fall 2014 to help enrich the graduate experiences of our many talented students. One component of ASCENT is an international travel grant program that allows students to pursue opporutnities for research enrichment activities outside the U.S.

    This year, Ph.D. candidate Christina McCluskey, who is advised by University Distinguished Professor Sonia Kreidenweis, was selected as one of the students to receive this award. Christina traveled to Carna, Ireland in August 2015 to participate in a research study conducted at Mace Head Atmospheric Research with the BACCHUS (Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic UnderStanding) European collaborative project. The main goal of the field study was to measure ambient aerosol to determine the influences of oceanic phytoplankton blooms on sea spray aerosol properties and abundances. Christina monitored concentrations of ice nucleating particles, atmospheric particles that initiate heterogeneous ice formation in clouds, during this study. The data from this study will advance the understanding how mixed phase clouds in oceanic and coastal regions might be influenced by ice nucleating particles associated with sea spray aerosol.

    Congratulations Christina!

    Read more about Christina's experience in this CSU SOURCE article: ASCENT Fund supports student's research contributions in Ireland.

    August 7, 2015: James Ruppert Receives 1st Place at 2015 AMS Conference on Meso Processes

    James Ruppert
    James Ruppert

    Congratulations Summer 2015 Ph.D. graduate James Ruppert, advised by Professor Richard Johnson, for receiving 1st Place for his oral presentation at the 2015 American Meteorological Society 15th Conference on Meso Processes. James' talk was titled "The diurnal cycle and Large-scale Tropical Climate". The objective of the study aimed to understand how the diurnal cycle fits into the greater climate system. The questions James asked are: how well do we model the diurnal cycle (on a global scale)? Can we neglect the diurnal cycle as a physical process? Can we get it wrong in climate models without consequences? James is now in search of answers to these questions during his postdoctoral fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M).

    Congrats James! Good luck with your continued research at MPI-M.


    July 31, 2015: 2015 CMMAP Student Research Symposium

    The CMMAP summer interns gave their final presentations on Friday, July 31, 2015 in the ATS West Seminar Room (Room 121). Atmospheric Science employees and students were invited to stop in and listen to the research presentations.

    2015 CMMAP Summer Interns

    The interns gave the following presentations:

    "Examining Intensity Trends During Extratropical Transition"Justin Baldizón StarkFlorida International University
    "Global Changes in Aerosol Optical Depth and PM2.5 Concentrations due to Open Domestic Waste Burning"Rachel CucinottaUniversity of North Carolina at Charlotte
    "Global Predictability of Daily Rainfall"Radha DuttaUniversity of Massachusetts - Amherst
    "Evolution of Extreme Precipitation: A Satellite Based Investigation"Ryan GonzalezTexas AA&M University
    "Evaluating the Potential Importance of Monoterpene Degradation for Global Acetone Production"Makoto KelpReed College
    "The Climatology and Impacts of Atmospheric Rivers near the Coast of Southern Alaska"Kyle NardiTemple University
    "Characterization of Ice Nucleating Particles at the California Coast"Katie RocciUniversity of New Hampshire
    "A Comparison of Cloud and Aerosol Measurements from OCO-2 and CALIPSO"Emily RosenthalMillersville University of Pennsylvania
    "Size Resolved Aerosol Composition near Rocky Mountain National Park"Rachel SussmanColorado College

    July 17, 2015: Undergraduate Interns Visit CSU Dept. of Atmospheric Science

    Interns from CMMAP, SOARS, CSU-CHILL, and NOAA participated in a mid-day visit to the Department of Atmospheric Science on Friday, July 17th. This event, organized by Graduate Coordinator Jamie Schmidt and CMMAP Education and Diversity Manager Melissa Burt, has occurred on a regular basis over the last few years. It allows undergraduate interns interested in a graduate education the opportunity to visit the Department of Atmospheric Science and get a feel for what is expected in a graduate school environment. During their visit, undergraduate interns listened intently to a presentation given by Department Head (Professor) Jeff Collett and Graduate Student Counselor (Assistant Professor) Russ Schumacher. Professor Collett welcomed the interns to the department and Professor Schumacher gave a graduate school overview with regards to the application process. Professor Collet and Assistant Professor Schumacher then fielded questions and gave advice and tips to the interns regarding applications and how best to prepare themselves for graduate school.

    In addition to this, undergraduate interns had the chance to visit with current Atmospheric Science students Chris Slocum, Christina McCluskey, Leah Grant, and Rob Nelson. These graduate students fielded questions about life as a graduate student in the Department of Atmospheric Science. Graduate students Peter Marinescu, Adele Igel, and Ali Boris then led interns on a ATS campus tour.

    July 9, 2015: Special Seminar with Tristan L'Ecuyer, "New Satellite Perspectives on the Arctic Energy and Water Cycles"

    Tristan L'Ecuyer Abstract

    June 5, 2015: Loops of Reflectivity and Radial Velocity of Tornados Near Berthoud

    The following images are loops of reflectivity and radial velocity from the CSU-CHILL National Radar Facility for last night's tornado near Berthoud CO (the loop runs from 0018 to 0049 UTC, 5 June 2015). The CHILL data show a well developed cyclonic rotation, or mesocyclone. Data courtesy of Pat Kennedy, CSU-CHILL Facility Manager.

    Tornados near Berthoud Radar Image

    Tornados near Berthoud Radar Image

    June 1, 2015: Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) Field Campaign

    CSU Department of Atmospheric Science Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher and several graduate students will be taking part in the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) field campaign from 1 June to 15 July 2015. This project aims to observe and better understand the thunderstorms that often form over the central US at night - these storms produce much of the rainfall that is critical for agriculture in this region but can also lead to hazardous weather in the way of severe winds, hail, and flash flooding. The project involves scientists from eight research laboratories and 14 universities, with a wide array of radars, research aircraft, and atmospheric profiling instruments that will take on the task of observing convection after dark. The CSU team will be collecting mobile radiosonde observations during the field phase of the project, and will seek to better understand the processes that govern the organization, motion, and rainfall production in nocturnal convective systems. The project website is pecan15.org, and an overview of PECAN from the National Science Foundation can be found here.

    Update: June 11, 2015

    Read the CSU SOURCE article highlighting the PECAN project, Why do thunderstorms strike at night? here.

    Update: July 29, 2015

    Watch the video and read the text article by National Geographic highlighting the PECAN project, Chasing Nighttime Thunderstorms, Trying to Crack Their Mysteries here.

    PECAN Project Group
    Graduate students Stacey Hitchcock and Erik Nielsen talking with folks at the PECAN Open House , Hays, KS

    May 15, 2015: Congratulations Spring 2015 Atmos Graduates!

    Congratulations go out to our recent Department of Atmospheric Science Graduates and Ph.D. Candidates, several who walked in Commencement Ceremonies on Friday, May 15th.

    The Department recognizes their dedication to science and research and is proud of their academic achievements. Graduation brings new and varied opportunities and there is no doubt that success awaits them in their future endeavors.

    Spring 2015 Graduates M.S./Ph.D. Include:
    Brett BasarabM.S.Adviser: Steven Rutledge
    Erin DaggM.S.Adviser: Richard Johnson/Thomas Birner
    Chris Eldred*Ph.D.Adviser: Dave Randall
    Bonne FordPh.D.Adviser: Colette Heald
    Nick Geyer*M.S.Adviser: Scott Denning
    Sasha Glanville*M.S.Adviser: Thomas Birner
    Alex Gonzalez*Ph.D.Adviser: Wayne Schubert
    Jack Kodros*M.S.Adviser: Jeff Pierce
    Jianbo LiuM.S.Adviser: Chris Kummerow
    Rob NelsonM.S.Adviser: Chris O'Dell
    John PetersPh.D.Adviser: Russ Schumacher
    Sarah RingerudPh.D.Adviser: Chris Kummerow
    James Ruppert*Ph.D.Adviser: Richard Johnson
    Kim SakamotoM.S.Adviser: Jeff Pierce
    Bradley WellsM.S.Adviser: Jeff Collett
    Samantha Wills*M.S.Adviser: Dave Thompson

    *Anticipated Graduation Summer 2015

    Prior to commencement ceremonies, Graduates, Ph.D. Candidates, and their families were invited to a graduate luncheon with faculty.

    Spring 2015 Grads
    Left to right: Alex Gonzalez, Sasha Glanville, Bradley Wells, Vandana Jha, Rob Nelson, Jianbo Liu, James Ruppert

    May 6, 2015: Colorado State Climatologist, Nolan Doesken, Will Speak at the Next FORTCAST Chapter Meeting

    Nolan Doesken
    Nolan Doeksen

    Colorado State Climatologist, Nolan Doesken, will speak about "The Role of Backyard Weather Watchers in the 21st Century, Water, and Climate Enterprise" at the upcoming FORT Collins Atmospheric ScientisTs (FORTCAST) Local Chapter Meeting. The next chapter meeting is scheduled for Thursday, May 21, 2015 at 6:30 pm in the Scott BioEngineering Building on CSU's main campus. This event is free to attend and open to the public. Food and beverages will be provided.

    Who: Nolan Doesken, Colorado State Climatologist
    What: "The Role of Backyard Weather Watchers in the 21st Century Weather, Water, and Climate Enterprise"
    When: Thursday May 21, 2015 at 6:30 pm
    Where: Room 101 at the Scott BioEngineering Building at Colorado State University

    Please RSVP if possible so we can plan accordingly. RSVP here or visit FORTCAST's website for more details.

    Nolan Doesken is the State Climatologist for Colorado at the Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University. He is fascinated with climate monitoring and long-term climate trends, but pays particularly close attention to precipitation including floods and drought. After the Fort Collins flash flood of 1997, Nolan established a volunteer rain gauge network, the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow network (CoCoRaHS), to track and map the local variations in northern Colorado precipitation. CoCoRaHS has nearly 20,000 volunteers in all 50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    May 4, 2015: Associate Professor Sue van den Heever Receives 2015 Graduate Student Council Award for Graduate Student Advising and Mentorship

    Sue van den Heever
    Sue van den Heever


    Congratulations to Monfort Professor Sue van den Heever for her selection as one of three recipients of this year's Graduate Student Council Award for Graduate Student Advising and Mentorship. Sue is an outstanding adviser to students in her group and regularly mentors other students in the department as well. Sue, who was nominated by her students, was one of 55 CSU faculty members and advisers nominated from across campus.

    Congratulations, Sue!

    April 29, 2015: 2015 Incoming Fall Students Receive AMS, NSF, and PRSE Fellowships

    Congratulations to 2015 incoming Fall students who won one or more of the following awards:

    American Meteorological Society Graduate Fellowship:
    The AMS Fellowship Program is a source of scholarships, useful resources, and unique opportunities for outstanding students looking to pursue graduate education in the atmospheric or related sciences. To date, 286 students have been designated as AMS fellowship recipients since its beginning in 1991. Of the 70 applicants per year, only 14 recipients are chosen for this fellowship.

    National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program:
    The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based Master's and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions.The 2015 fellowship competition was very competitive with over 16,000 applications received. Approximately 2,000 Fellowship Awards were presented, along with 2,000 Honorable Mentions.

    The Colorado State Programs of Research and Scholarly Excellence (PRSE) Fellowship:
    Prestigious CSU internal fellowship. Admitted students are nominated for these awards by their department.

    Samuel ChildsM.S.Advisor: Russ SchumacherAMS and NSF Fellowships
    Sean FreemanM.S.Advisor: Sue van den HeeverAMS and NSF Fellowships
    Karly ReimelM.S.Advisor: Steven RutledgeAMS Fellowship
    Jakob LindaasM.S.Advisor: Emily FischerAMS Fellowship
    Louis RivoirePh.D.Advisor: Thomas Birner/John KnaffPRSE Fellowship
    Richard SchulteM.S.Advisor: Chris KummerowAMS Fellowship

    To see the complete list of the 2015 Fall Incoming Class, please visit our homepage.

    April 21, 2015: Physics Today Features Article by M.S. 2014 Graduate Annareli Morales

    Annareli Morales
    Annareli Morales

    M.S. 2014 Graduate Annareli Morales' M.S. research titled, "Cyclonic circulation development during extreme precipitation" is featured in the April 21 Daily Edition, Down To Earth section of Physics Today. Annareli, a M.S. December 2014 graduate co-advised by Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher and Professor Sonia Kreidenweis, explored the impact of latent heating on the development of a mesoscale vortex observed near Boulder during the September 2013 Colorado floods. Her simulations and sensitivity studies suggest that the vortex was responsible for the increased rain rates that led to significant flooding in Boulder. Understanding the mechanisms involved with these phenomena will help improve their forecasting and their impact on public safety. To learn more about Annareli's current research, visit her student page on the University of Michigan's Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences' website.

    Figure 1 April 21 Physics Today
    Figure 1 from "Cyclonic circulation development during extreme precipitation"

    Figure 1. Radar observations from the Denver (KFTG) radar at 0612 UTC 12 September 213 showing the mesoscale vortex over Boulder. (a) Radial velocity showing a couplet of winds toward the radar (green) and away from the radar (red) in close proximity. The couplet is associated with rotation. The blue arrow represents the direction of upslope flow. (b) Radar reflectivity showing an enhanced convective band over Boulder. The cities of Fort Collins (F), Boulder (B), and Denver (D) are provided as reference.

    April 17, 2015: Professor James R. Fleming - M.S. '73 - Receives 2015 CSU Atmospheric Science Distinguished Alumni Award

    Professor James R. Fleming (Jim) received the 2015 CSU Department of Atmospheric Science Distinguished Alumni Award by Department Head Jeff Collett. This award is presented to an outstanding alumnus and/or alumna who exemplifies core values revered by the Department including dedication to research, commitment to education, and leadership prowess in the atmospheric sciences. These values, exemplified throughout the course of Jim's distinguished career, are the very reason he was chosen for this award.

    Since graduating with an M.S. from the department in 1973, Jim earned a Ph.D. in history from Princeton University. Jim is a historian of science and technology and Professor of Science, Technology and Society at Colby College, Maine. His teaching bridges the sciences and the humanities, and his research interests involve the history of the geophysical sciences, especially meteorology and climate change. In 2003 Professor Fleming was elected a Fellow of the AAAS "for pioneering studies on the history of meteorology and climate change and for the advancement of historical work within meteorological societies." He held the Charles A. Lindberg Chair in Aerospace History at the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution in 2005-06 and the AAAS Roger Revelle Fellowship in Global Stewardship at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in 2006-07. Professor Fleming is the founder and first president of the International Commission on History of Meteorology, editor-in-chief of History of Meteorology, and series editor for Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology. His books include Fixing the Sky: The Checkered History of Weather and Climate Control (Columbia University Press, 2010), The Callendar Effect(American Meteorological Society, 2007), Historical Perspectives on Climate Change (Oxford University Press, 1998), and Meteorology in America, 1800-1870 (John Hopkins University Press, 1990). He is currently working on a biography of the CO2 molecule, a book on Harry Wexler and the emergence of atmospheric science, and a project examining "sense of place" in the Belgrade Lakes Region.

    The Department would like to congratulate Jim on his body of work and thank him for proudly representing CSU over the years.

    In addition to receiving this award, Jim gave a special colloquium presentation, "The Gordian Knot of Meteorology: Unraveling it, Cutting it, Retying it" during the award ceremony. He also gave a special presentation in honor of the 100th Anniversary of Herbert Riehl's birth during the Herbert Riehl Memorial Award/Alumni Award Ceremony, also held on April 17 (see news announcement below).

    April 17, 2015: Christina McCluskey and Adele Igel Receive Outstanding Department Honors at the Herbert Riehl Memorial Award/Alumni Award Ceremony

    Congratulations goes out to Ph.D. candidate Christina McCluskey and Ph.D. candidate Adele Igel for receiving distinguished honors this week at the annual CSU Department of Atmospheric Science Herbert Riehl Memorial Award/Alumni Ceremony held on Friday, April 17.

    Christina, a Ph.D. candidate of Professor Sonia Kreidenweis, received the Herbert Riehl Memorial Award based on her publication, "Characteristics of atmospheric ice nucleating particles associated with biomass burning in the US: Prescribed burns and wildfires" [McCluskey et al., 2014]. Adele, a Ph.D. student of Associate Professor Sue van den Heever, received the Alumni Award based on her publication, "Make it a double: Sobering results from single- and double-moment microphysics simulations" [Igel, A.L., M.R. Igel, and S.C. van den Heever, 2015].

    The granting of both of these awards is based on faculty nominations and a committee decision. The Herbert Riehl Memorial Award is awarded to a current Master's Degree candidate or a student in the Ph.D. program for less than one year. The student must have obtained their M.S. degree from our Department and have submitted a technical manuscript for publication during the previous eighteen-month period. The Alumni Award is given to a senior Ph.D. candidate who has passed the preliminary exam and has submitted at least one paper to the peer-reviewed literature based on their dissertation work.

    Christina presented her research after receiving her award during the ceremony. Adele, who received the NSF Graduate Research Opportunities Worldwide (NSF GROW) Award in May 2014 awarding her the support for a visit to an international institution to conduct research for three months, will present her research when she returns from Stockholm University where she is currently working with Dr. Annica Ekman and her group on research related to arctic stratus clouds.

    The department would like to congratulate Christina and Adele again for their hard work and recognize them for their outstanding achievement.

    April 16, 2015: Associate Professor Susan C. van den Heever Named CSU Monfort Professor

    Sue van den Heever
    Sue van den Heever

    The Department of Atmospheric Science is pleased to announce Associate Professor Susan C. van den Heever as one of the 2015 CSU Monfort Professors. The Monfort Professorship is CSU's premier recognition for mid-career faculty. This prestigious title is given to two faculty members per year by a committee appointed by the Provost. Faculty members retain this designation for two years and receive $75,000 per year to further their teaching and research.

    "Dr. van den Heever is among our most productive faculty, already achieving a record of outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service," said David McLean, the dean of the College of Engineering. "Her balanced record of achievement in research, teaching, and service embodies the land grant mission."

    "As one of the nation's top programs in the field of atmospheric science, expectations for CSU Atmospheric Science Department faculty are extremely high; Sue easily bests those standards," said Jeffrey L. Collett, Jr., head of the Department of Atmospheric Science. "Sue is an outstanding role model for the many talented young women and men that enter our graduate program. I can think of no one better suited for selection as a Monfort Professor."

    Read the CSU SOURCE Celebrate Celebrate! Colorado State Award Winners article about this designation here.

    Congratulations, Sue, on this outstanding achievement!

    March 31, 2015: Congratulations 2015 NSF Fellowship Recipients and Honorable Mentions

    CSU Department of Atmospheric Science master's students Steven Brey, Greg Herman, and Peter Marinescu along with recently accepted Fall 2015 master's students Sean Freeman and Samuel Childs were all recognized this week by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Peter Marinescu, advised by Associate Professor Susan C. van den Heever and by Professor Sonia Kreidenweis, Sean Freeman, soon to be advised by Associate Professor Susan C. van den Heever, and Samuel Childs, soon to be advised by Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher, received a NSF Fellowship Award. Steven Brey, advised by Assistant Professor Emily Fischer, and Greg Herman, advised by Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher, received a NSF Fellowship Honorable Mention.

    The 2015 fellowship competition was very competitive with over 16,000 applications received. Approximately 2,000 Fellowship Awards were presented, along with 2,000 Honorable Mentions.

    The department would like to congratulate Steven, Greg, Peter, Sean, and Samuel!

    Not pictured: Samuel Childs

    March 23, 2015: First Lady's Kitchen Garden becomes part of the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow (CoCoRaHS) citizen science network

    Nolan White House Rain Gauge
    Nolan Doesken, the White House

    Media Fact sheet info from The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy:

    Science is everywhere, including the White House: The White House will showcase that anyone can participate by installing a new rain gauge in the First Lady's Kitchen Garden, becoming part of the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow (CoCoRaHS) citizen science network of over 20,000 active participants who serve as the largest source of daily precipitation data in the United States.

    Appendix to Factsheet:

    Installation of a Rain Gauge in the White House Garden: The White House, in collaboration with the National Atmospheric and Oceanographic Administration NOAA and the National Park Service (NPS), will install a new rain gauge in the First Lady's Kitchen Garden as the White House becomes a new participant in the CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network) citizen science project. The White House will begin making contributions as an additional data source to the citizen scientist project during Science Fair. There are millions of citizen scientists in this country willingly contributing valuable time and effort to help advance our collective understanding of the world around us. The CoCoRaHS Network's over 20,000+ active volunteers serve as the largest source of daily precipitation data in our country, reporting measurement from coastal lowlands to the high peaks of Rocky Mountain National Park. CoCoRaHS data are used by a wide variety of groups, including: NOAA's National Weather Service, private sector and university meteorologists, hydrologists, emergency managers, city utilities (water supply, water conservation, storm water), insurance adjusters, USDA, engineers, mosquito control, ranchers and farmers, outdoor & recreation interests, teachers, and students.

    Photo credit: Darlene Cavalier

    See the CSU SOURCE article here.

    Watch Al Roker interview NOAA Administrator Kathryn Sullivan about CoCoRaHS here.

    March 17, 2015: Ashley Evanoski-Cole Receives Outstanding Student Oral Presentation Award at 2015 AMS Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry

    Ashley Evanoski-Cole
    Ashley Evanoski-Cole

    Ashley Evanoski-Cole, Ph.D. student of Professor Jeff Collett, received an outstanding student oral presentation award for her presentation, "Impacts of Oil and Gas Development in the North Dakota Bakken Formation Region on Winter Particulate Matter and Associated Precursor Gases" from the American Meteorological Society 17th Atmospheric Chemistry Conference in January 2015. For this field study, Ashley and a team of scientists from Jeff Collett and Sonia Kreidenweis' research groups and the National Park Service made measurements at five different national parks over two winters in western North Dakota and eastern Montana to investigate the impacts of the rapidly developing oil and gas industry on the air quality in these pristine places.

    Congratulations Ashley!

    March 4, 2015: Aaron Piña Receives 2nd Place at 2015 AMS Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry

    Aaron Piña
    Aaron Piña

    Congratulations to Ph.D. student Aaron Piña for receiving 2nd Place for his oral presentaion at the 2015 American Meteorological Society 17th Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry. Reactive nitrogen from cattle feedlots in eastern Colorado is reaching pristine alpine lakes in Rocky Mountain National Park, leading to undesirable ecosystem changes. Aaron's presentation, Prediction System for Nitrogen Deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park, discussed the development of an early warning system, which utilizes output from Russ Schumacher's operational WRF runs. The early warning system allows feedlot producers to temporarily alter management practices that reduce nitrogen emissions. More information on the early warning system can be found on the Rocky Mountain National Park Early Warning System website.

    Congrats Aaron!

    February 28, 2015: 24th Annual Little Shop of Physics Open House

    Graduate students, faculty, and staff from ATS, CMMAP, and CIRA volunteered for the 24th Annual Little Shop of Physics Open House on Saturday, February 28, 2015. Each year, the Little Shop of Physics team invites members of the public to come for a day of hands-on science. Our science room, "Exploring our Atmosphere", featured a variety of hands-on activity about weather and climate. The Annual Open House features a wide selection of hands-on experiment stations, a series of interactive science "shows", science spectacles. This year, the February event drew over 6,000 visitors, mostly K-12 students and their families.

    February 19, 2015: Brandon Wolding Receives Outstanding Student Presentation at 2015 AMS

    BrandonWolding
    Brandon Wolding

    Congratulations to Ph.D. student Brandon Wolding for being selected as one of two award winners for Outstanding Student Presentations at the Third Symposium on Prediction of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: Processes, Prediction, and Impact at the 95th AMS Annual Meeting. Brandon's talk, titled "Moisture and Madden-Julian Oscillation", sought to identify the physical processes that drive moisture variations associated with the MJO. Dr. Carl J. Schreck III, one of the MJO Symposium Co-Chairs, stated Brandon's presentation was "one of the clearest explanations of moist static energy that I have seen, and the results were very intriguing".

    Well done Brandon!

    February 5, 2015: Distinguished Professor Emeritus Graeme Stephens Elected to National Academy of Engineering

    GraemeStephens
    Graeme Stephens

    CSU Atmospheric Science University Distinguished Professor Emeritus Graeme Stephens has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature," and to the "pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education." To learn more about this announcement, visit the NAE website.

    Dr. Graeme Stephens completed his B.S. with honors from the University of Melbourne in 1973 and received his Ph.D. in 1977 from the same university. He was appointed to the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research in 1977 as a research scientist and promoted to senior research scientist in 1982. From 1979 to 1980, Professor Stephens served as a post-doctoral research student at the CSU Department of Atmospheric Science. He joined the faculty as an associate professor in 1984 and was promoted to full professor in 1991. Dr. Stephens retired from CSU in 2010 and is currently the Director of the Center for Climate Sciences at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    Dr. Stephens' research activities focus on atmospheric radiation including the application of remote sensing in climate research to understand the role of hydrological processes in climate change. He also serves as the primary investigator (PI) of the NASA CloudSat Mission and associated research group which has launched a satellite to study the internals of clouds using equipment similar to radar.

    Congratulations, Dr. Stephens, on this terrific and well-deserved honor!

    Update February 25, 2015: Read the CSU SOURCE article highlighting Graeme Stephens election to the NAE here.

    January 29, 2015: Leah Grant and Renee Duff Receive 2015 AMS Awards

    Congratulations to Ph.D. student Leah Grant and 2014 Summer CMMAP Intern Renee Duff for their awards at the 95th AMS Annual Meeting held in Phoenix, Arizona! Leah and Renee investigated the impact of enhanced aerosol concentrations, such as would be associated with pyrocumulus clouds forming over active fires, on the microphysical characteristics of an idealized pyrocumulus cloud simulated with RAMS. They then used the microphysics information to infer possible electrification mechanisms for pyrocumulus convection.

    Leah received an Outstanding Student Presentation Award for her talk in the Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions Symposium: "Aerosol-induced microphysical processes and electrification in pyrocumulus".

    Renee won Best Student Poster at the AMS Student Conference: "Wildfire Pollution and its Effects on the Microphysical and Electrical Properties of Pyrocumulus".

    January 27, 2015: 2014 AMS President William Gail is Coming to CSU! Feb. 12 & 13

    2014 AMS President William Gail
    2014 AMS President William B. Gail, Ph.D.

    Bill Gail, the 2014 AMS President, has graciously agreed to a two-part speaking engagement at CSU on Thursday, February 12 and Friday, February 13. FORT Collins Atmospheric ScientisTs (FORTCAST) is hosting his visit. He will speak for two different topics; we hope you can attend both events!

    Thursday February 12, 2015, 6:30 pm - Scott BioEngineering Room 101
    Bill will give a talk on The Role of Scientific and Professional Societites in the Enterprise at the FORTCAST Local Chapter Meeting of the AMS. This event is free to attend and open to the public. We would like a strong attendance from the department and hope to get as many faculty, staff, and students to attend this lecture as possible. Food and beverage will be provided. Please RSVP if possible so we can plan accordingly. RSVP here. See the event flyer here .

    Friday, February 13, 2015, 11:15 am - ATS/CIRA Colloquium - CSU Dept Atmospheric Science
    Bill will visit the department and is the speaker for the ATS/CIRA Colloquium. His Colloquium talk, After Climate Change, What's Next?, will highlight some of the discussion from his recent book Climate Connundrums: What the Climate Debate Reveals About Us.

    January 21, 2015: In Memory of Professor Emeritus Peter Sinclair

    PeterSinclair
    Peter Sinclair

    Professor Emeritus Peter Sinclair passed away on January 21, 2015, four weeks shy of his 86th birthday.

    Professor Sinclair joined CSU's Department of Atmospheric Science in 1965 as a turbulence expert with a thesis in dust devils, formally retired in 1993, and remained an active researcher with the department for many years. He graduated with a degree in meteorology from the University of Washington in 1952, served as an Air Force weather officer from 1952-1956, a graduate student with the Department of Meteorology at UCLA from 1957-59, and then joined the Atmospheric Physics group at the University of Arizona where he obtained his Ph.D. in 1964.

    Professor Sinclair piloted his own aircraft for research in many different field studies over his tenure at CSU. He taught in the areas of meteorology instruments, cloud physics, cumulus convection and severe weather. He also supervised the construction and operation of the weather radar on the roof of the ATS building during the 1970s to early 1980s.

    You can view Peter Sinclair's original obituary on the Goes Funeral Care website here

    January 15, 2015: CSU Researchers to Study Health Dangers of Wildfire Smoke, Build Better Warning System

    Department of Atmospheric Science assistant professors Jeff Pierce (principal investigator) and Emily Fischer, along with assistant professor Sheryl Magzamen of Environmental and Radiological Health Science and associate professor John Volckens of Mechanical Engineering, have received a $1.2 million NASA grant to study the public health toll from inhaling dense wildfire smoke and to build an improved air quality forecasting system.

    Learn more about their research and future impact in the article "CSU researchers to study health dangers of wildfire smoke, build better warning system" written by Kortny Rolston highlighted in CSU's SOURCE.

    High Park Fire Satellite
    "In 2012, the High Park Fire ripped through the mountains west of Fort Collins, charring 87,284 acres and hundreds of homes. Smoke from the fire permeated Colorado's Front Range and neighboring states for weeks, forcing millions to breathe particulate-laden air." CSU SOURCE

    January 14, 2015: David Henderson and Veljko Petkovic Each Receive an AMS Outstanding Student Presentation: Joint Satellite Program Award

    Congratulations to Professor Chris Kummerow's Ph.D. students David Henderson and Veljko Petkovic for each receiving the Outstanding Student Presentation: Joint Satellite Program award at the 95th Annual Meeting of the American Meteorological Society held in Phoenix, Arizona. Presentations focused on describing new concepts, research, operations, and practical application of satellite measurements for analyzing and predicting the weather, the ocean, the climate, and the environment.

    David's research, entitled "Investigating the Effect of ENSO Upon Oceanic Rainfall Estimates", describes how anomalous shifts in passive oceanic rainfall intensity are linked to the level of organization in oceanic precipitating systems. Receiving this oral presentation award was especially gratifying for David, as he also won for the same topic, except in poster form, at the WCRP and EUMETSAT Climate Symposium in Darmstadt, Germany back in October of this past year.

    Veljko's research, entitled "Improving the Quality of Extreme Precipitation Estimates Using Satellite Passive Microwave Rainfall Retrievals", looks for a deeper understanding of the influence of environmental conditions on defining the ice-to-rain ratio that provides a foundation for addressing biases seen in passive microwave rainfall retrievals globally. The Department has no doubt that future awards for Veljko's research, like David's, are right around the corner as well, as Veljko was honored earlier in 2014 with a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship (NESSF) award.

    Congratulations David and Veljko!

    January 6, 2015: FORTCAST Wins Poster Award at AMS

    FORTCAST, the Northern Colorado Local Chapter of the AMS, kicked off their year on a high note at AMS by taking third place in the annual "local chapter" poster contest. Their poster, created by Chapter FORTCAST President Melissa Burt and Chapter Officer Peter Marinescu with contributions from all FORTCAST members, sought to explain FORTCAST, its mission, and its commitment to advance atmospheric science and educational outreach in the surrounding Northern Colorado Area. Interested in joining FORTCAST? Learn more about them by visiting their website.

    Members of the FORTCAST Executive Board proudly show off their winning poster at the 95th AMS Annual Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona.

    FORTCAST Team With Poster at AMS
    Pictured left to right: Erik Nielsen (Officer), Melissa Burt (President), Matt Rogers (Outreach Coordinator), Leah Grant (Vice President) and Peter Marinescu (Officer)

    December 22, 2014: Professor Steven Rutledge and Dr. Brenda Dolan to Receive the 2015 Robert H. Goddard Award

    Professor Steven Rutledge and Dr. Brenda Dolan, members of the Precipitation Measuring Missions Ground Validation Team, were nominated this fall, along with their fellow team members, for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Robert H. Goddard Award. This award, named after rocket pioneer Robert Hutchings Goddard, is given annually and honors Exceptional Achievement in Science. The GPM Ground Validation Team works on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and the recently launched Global Precipitation Mission. The GPM satellite consists of a dual frequency radar and GMI Microwave Imager that is communicating with other satellites previously in orbit. The goal of this mission is to advance precipitation measurements from space. Contributions made by Steve and Brenda to the team's efforts included leadership in several GV field programs including the NASA-DOE Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment in Spring 2011, the IFLOODS GPM ground validation program in Iowa in 2013, and IPHEX in summer 2014. The department would like to congratulate Steve and Brenda on this prestigious team award. Dr. Walt Petersen (NASA-Wallops), leader of the PMM Ground Validation program will receive the award on behalf of the team in March 2015 during a ceremony at Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Petersen earned his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences at Colorado State University in 1997.

    December 19, 2014: Congratulations Fall 2014 Atmos Graduates!

    Congratulations go out to our recent Department of Atmospheric Science Graduates and Ph.D. Candidates, several who walked in Commencement Ceremonies on Friday, Dec. 19th.

    The Department recognizes their dedication to science and research and is proud of their academic achievements. Graduation brings new and varied opportunities and there is no doubt that success awaits them in their future endeavors.

    Graduates/M.S. Ph.D. Include:
    Gus Alaka Ph.D. Adviser: Eric Maloney
    Bonne Ford*Ph.D.Adviser: Colette Heald
    Eliott FoustM.S.Adviser: Dave Thompson
    Matt IgelPh.D.Adviser: Sue van den Heever
    Alyssa MatthewsM.S. Adviser: Steven Rutledge
    Annareli Morales M.S. Advisers: Sonia Kreidenweis and Russ Schumacher
    Sarah Ringerud*Ph.D.Adviser: Chris Kummerow
    Jeremiah SjobergPh.D.Adviser: Thomas Birner

    *Anticipated Graduation Spring 2015

    Prior to commencement ceremonies, Graduates, Ph.D. Candidates and their families were invited to a graduate luncheon with faculty.

    2014 Fall Atmos Graduates
    Left to Right: Jeremiah Sjoberg, Bonne Ford, Alyssa Matthews, Annareli Morales, Sarah Ringerud, and Matt Igel

    December 10, 2014: Atmospheric Awards and Recognition Ceremony

    On December 10th, the Department of Atmospheric Science held its annual Atmospheric Awards and Recognition Ceremony/Luncheon. Faculty and Staff Milestones, along with 2014 Student and Post Doctoral Fellowship and Scholarship Award Winners were recognized.

    We would like to take the time to congratulate all of our awards winners.

    The commitment of our students, post docs, faculty, researchers, and staff are invaluable and make our department a cohesive unit that strives for excellence not only in academics and research, but in public outreach as well.

    Student Appointments, Awards, and Recognition
    2013 AGU Fall Meeting Outstanding Student Paper Steve D'Andrea
    2014 AAAR Poster Award Steve D'Andrea and Jack Krodros
    2014-2015 CSU International Presidential Fellow Zitely Tzompa, Steve D'Andrea
    Outstanding Student Presentation at Intl. Lightning and Meteorology Conference (Kreider Scholarship) Brody Fuchs
    2014 WCRP and EUMETSAT Climate Symposium Top Poster Winner David Henderson
    Postdoctoral Awards
    NSF AGU-PRF (Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship) John Albers, Walter Hannah, Shunsuke Nakao, Matt Igel, and Greg Schill
    NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowship Nathan Arnold
    SoGES (Colorado State University Global Sustainability Leadership Fellow) Andrea Clements and Hannakaisa Lindqvist
    Student Fellowships
    AFIT (Air Force Institute of Technology) Bryan Mundhenk and Robert Tournay
    AGEP (Alliance for Graduate Education and Professoriate) Jordan Allan and Jake Zaragoza
    AMS Aryeh Drager, Caitlin Fine, Erik Nielsen, and Peter Marinescu
    AWMA Yi Li and Brad Wells
    CIRA Leah Grant and Todd Jones
    CMMAP Diversity Noel Hilliard
    CONACYT(Mexican National Council for Science and Technology) Zitely Tzompa
    Dietrich Scholarship Sam Atwood
    DOE Krell Chris Eldred
    EPA STAR Fellowhip Ashley Evanoski-Cole
    GATES Millennium Scholars Isaac Medina
    I-Water (Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education, and Research) Aaron Piña, Isaac Medina, and Gavin Roy
    NASA NESSF (NASA Earth and Space Science Award) Matt Igel, Veljko Petkovic, and Sarah Ringerud
    NSF Nick Davis, Aryeh Drager, Leah Grant, Adele Igel, Erik Nielsen, Gavin Roy, Elizabeth Thompson
    NSF EAPSI Ali Boris and Adam Rydbeck
    NSF GROW Adele Igel
    NSF Honorable Mention Greg Herman
    NSERC (Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada) Kim Sakamoto and Landan Macdonald
    PRSE (Programs for Research and Scholarly Excellence) Greg Herman and Steve Brey
    Shrake Culler Scholarship Isaac Medina, Stephanie Henderson, James Ruppert, and Doug Stolz
    Sjostrom Family Scholarship Zitely Tzompa
    SOARS (Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Reserach and Science) Jake Zaragoza and Annareli Morales

    December 2, 2014: Chris Kummerow and Jamie Schmidt Receive College of Engineering Awards

    Chris Kummerow and Jamie Schmidt at the All College Awards Ceremony
    Chris Kummerow and Jamie Schmidt

    Professor Chris Kummerow and Graduate Coordinator Jamie Schmidt were each recognized with major College of Engineering awards at the All College Meeting on December 2nd. Dean McClean presented Chris with the Abell Outstanding Faculty Research Award, while Jamie received the Outstanding Classified Employee Award.

    The Abell Award is presented each year in recognition of high quality, nationally acclaimed research productivity with a particular focus on the proceeding five years of work and Chris and his research fit this description impeccably. Chris has been extremely busy with his research since coming to the Department in June 2000. In that time frame, he has worked on multiple missions (TRMM, CloudSat and most recently GPM) and has participated in multiple steering committees over the years that include AMSR. Chris plays an active role in planning and defining new space borne missions geared towards a better understanding of the Global Water and Energy Cycle, while still fulfilling all of his duties as the director of CIRA as well. To learn more about Chris and his group, please take a look at his group's website.

    The Outstanding Classified Award is also presented each year and is bestowed upon a State Classified Employee who exemplifies dedication and commitment to the college, the university, and fellow Department employees, students and staff as well. The recipient is one who strives for excellence in every aspect of their work and there is no better way to describe our dept. award winner Jamie Schmidt. Jamie, who began her career at CSU in July 2006 in the Department of Admissions as a Graduate Processor and moved onto the Department of Atmospheric Science in February 2008, is best known for her role as the Department Graduate Coordinator and Assistant to the Department Head, but has duties way beyond this. Although many fall under those job titles, they are wide and varied and include more time in the day than she possibly has to give. This being said, one never sees her turn away a student, a faculty member, or fellow employee that has come to her for aid. She always finds time to fit everyone into her day. The Department's graduate students and prospective student are integral to her job, as she is responsible for department graduate admissions, graduate recruitment and retention, and graduate program coordination. In addition to this, Jamie assists Department Head Jeff Collett on a daily basis and also provides faculty support, supervises and evaluates an Admin II Position, assists with web updates and maintains and updates alumni contact and career information. Along with this, Jamie continues to take classes at CSU to improve herself and continue along her future career path. Her goal is to better herself and everyone else around her and to provide the best support that she can.

    In summary, both of these individuals are outstanding College of Engineering and Department of Atmospheric Science employees, and the Department is proud of both them and wishes to acknowledge them both and congratulate them on their past accomplishments and future endeavors as well.

    December 2, 2014: AAAR T-Shirts On Sale For A Limited Time!!

    AAAR T-shirt artist's rendition

    Just in time for the holidays, AAAR will be selling t-shirts with a brand new logo designed by the sister of recent Ph.D. department graduate Matt Igel. These t-shirts will be grey and made of 100% organic, ring spun cotton (extra soft and environmentally friendly!!!).

    T-shirts are $15-$20 a piece (Please pay what you feel you can. Although this is a fundraiser, AAAR understands that grad. students may be short of cash around the holidays, but these make great gifts for yourself, your "bestest" atmospheric science friends, or even your family.)

    Proceeds will go to your CSU American Association for Aerosol Research(AAAR) student chapter, specifically to help get to the Storm Peak Lab this year!

    Act before it's too late by going to: http://goo.gl/forms/G3KmjQ1UgN

    T-shirts should be available before Christmas. Please have your order form filled out before 12:00 (noon) this Friday, December 5th.

    Please bring cash payments to Ali Boris (ATS Chem 111) or your friendly next-door AAAR member, or pay when you pick up your shirts.

    Thanks for your support!!!

    November 24, 2014: Sam Atwood Receives the David L. Dietrich Honorary Scholarship

    Sam Atwood being presented the Dietrich Scholarship plaque by Department head Jeff Collett
    Sam Atwood and Department Head (Professor)
    Jeff Collett

    Congratulations to PhD student Sam Atwood for being selected as this year's winner of the David L. Dietrich Honorary Scholarship. This $2500 award, funded each year by Fort Collins-based Air Resource Specialists, Inc., is given in honor of retired ARS President David Dietrich. The award goes each year to a CSU student who has demonstrated outstanding ability in air quality research and education.

    Sam is working with Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis on studies of aerosols in SE Asia. He was recognized for the high quality of his work, his strong publication record, his dedication to assisting student colleagues in their own research, and his ability to successfully conduct high quality measurements under difficult field conditions. Sam has been termed the MacGyver of aerosol measurements!

    November 13, 2014: Exploring the Influence of Gender in Science and the Environment

    The second installment of the Graduate Women in Science (GWIS) two-part panel series titled "Exploring the Influence of Gender in Science and the Environment" will take place this evening, November 13th, from 6-7pm, at Avogadro's Number at 605 Mason Street in Fort Collins. If you have time to attend this event, your support would greatly be appreciated plus...being exposed to a panel discussion such as this gives everyone the opportunity to gain new insights and perspectives into the roles of women in science.

    The newly established GWIS Northern Colorado Chapter is being spearheaded by one of the Department's very own professors, Assistant Professor Emily Fischer, along with help from her Ph.D. student Zitely Tzompa, a founding member, as well as many others. Along with the department, the panel series is sponsored by the School of Global Environmental Sustainability (SOGES), the Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research (CWSGR), the Ripple Effect (Women's Initiative), and the Global Women Scholars Network. Last week, approximately 70 participants were in attendance from a variety of backgrounds. The hope is for an equally good turnout this evening, so hope to see you there.

    Graduate Women in Science panelists
    Panelists and participants of the first GWIS series enjoyed intense discussions, as well as networking opportunities as pictured above.

    November 12, 2014: Jack Kodros and Steve D'Andrea Receive Student Poster Competition Awards During AAAR 33rd Annual Conference

    Congratulations go out to Atmospheric Science Students Jack Kodros and Steve D'Andrea for receiving Student Poster Competition Awards during the AAAR 33rd Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida last month. The AAAR conference brings scientists, students and AAAR Fellows together each year to share their latest findings and review the latest advances in technology in aerosol research. Four symposia were included at this year's event and all four worked to bridge the gap in the multiple disciplines that exist in atmospheric research. Symposia topics included research areas like aerosols and public health, while sessions included presentations that ranged from aerosol chemistry, to clouds and climate, to health-related aerosols, and aerosol exposure as well. With the varied format, Jack and Steve's poster fit right into the conference proceedings. Jack's award winning poster was titled "Uncertainties in Global Aerosol and Climate Forcings from Biofuel Emissions." and Steve's was "Source Attribution of Aerosol Size Distributions and Model Evaluation Using Whistler Mountain Measurements and GEOS-Chem-TOMAS Simulations." Given all their hard work, the department would like to congratulate these two students again and thank them for their contributions to science and to the department. It is students such as these that make this department a premier research venue.

    Jack Kodros and Steve D'Andrea

    November 3, 2014: Professor Sonia Kreidenweis as Interim Associate Dean for Research in the College of Engineering (COE)

    Sonia Kreidenweis
    Sonia Kreidenweis

    Professor Sonia Kreidenweis, 23 year faculty member of the Department of Atmospheric Science, will take on a new role in January 2015, that of Interim Associate Dean for Research in the College of Engineering (COE). Sonia will be filling the role of Dr. Wade Troxell, who will be going on sabbatical leave during the spring semester and will return as a faculty member in Mechanical Engineering in August of 2015. Sonia will hold the interim position through this same time frame and will bring a wealth of knowledge to COE with all of her experience at CSU. She will be a valuable asset to them as they search for a permanent replacement in the spring semester. The department wishes Sonia the best as she takes on additional duties in the new year.

    October 28, 2014: Zitely Tzompa named a CSU International Presidential Fellow for 2014-2015

    Zitely Tzompa in Ski gear
    Zitely Tzompa

    Congratulations go out to Zitely Tzompa, a Ph.D. student of Assistant Professor Emily Fischer, for being named a CSU International Presidential Fellow for 2014-2015. Zitely, part of a diverse group of approximately 27 graduate students and visiting scholars, representing multiple academic disciplines across CSU, was chosen for her her international background, international research interests, and her willingness to network and interact with other researchers at CSU. The International Presidential Fellowship Program seeks out candidates with future international leadership skills and promotes their development through a variety of events during the academic year that include introductions to new and on-going research through multiple networking events and campus tours. Zitely is very excited about her new role and the department wishes her the best and is proud to have her represent our department as well.

    October 28, 2014: Cans Around the Oval 2014

    Cans around the oval

    On behalf of FORTCAST... Thanks to all of you whose contributions of non-perishable food and/or monetary donations helped make Cans Around the Oval 2014 a SUCCESS.

    The efforts of the Department of Atmospheric Science and CIRA raised 248 lbs. of food and $565 for the Food Bank of Larimer County. Those numbers resulted in a total impact of 2,508 lbs. of food...seemingly a record donation total from ATS/CIRA which exceeded our expectations and goals. Every single contribution is going to make a difference for our neighbors, friends, and colleagues in need.

    CSU, together with the Larimer County Community, raised 47,470 lbs. of food and $46,743 total!!! This translates to a total impact of 186,974 lbs. of food collected which is a phenomenal number.

    Congratulations and Thank You again to everyone for a job well done and we look forward to collecting even more food and donations next year.

    October 22, 2014: Rob Nelson's Masters research published in Physics Today

    Robert Nelson
    Robert Nelson

    Graduate student Rob Nelson's Masters research work involving satellite-based measurements of carbon dioxide was recently published online in Physics Today. Rob's article discusses his efforts to better understand empirical aerosol corrections used in most CO2 retrievals. The results from his work may be used to improve the retrieval algorithm currently used by NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2).

    OCO-2 was successfully launched in July of this year with the primary component of the satellite dedicated to measuring carbon dioxide from space with unprecedented accuracy. CSU has played a major role in OCO-2 with Assistant Professor Christopher O'Dell (Rob's advisor) and his team leading the development of the algorithms that will convert the sunlight measurements into CO2 concentrations. In addition, they have also been pioneering ways to better exploit these measurements.

    Rob's research work at CSU will continue along these lines and the department looks forward to following his research results and updates from the OCO-2 satellite as well.

    October 20, 2014: Doug Stolz Receives the Shrake Culler Scholarship

    Doug Stolz
    Doug Stolz

    Congratulations to Atmospheric Science Ph.D. student Doug Stolz for receiving the Shrake Culler Scholarship. This award, presented by CSU's Department of Engineering, is granted to a student who demonstrates a passion for higher education, along with an outstanding work ethic and a successful academic record. Doug has accomplished all of these things and was an excellent choice for the award. The department is proud of his accomplishments and wishes him continued success as he progresses in his academic career at CSU.

    October 13, 2014: Happy 85th Birthday Dr. Gray!

    Dr Gray at his 85th birthy celebration

    On October 13th, the Department of Atmospheric Science was pleased to recognize Emeritus Professor Dr. Gray with an 85th birthday celebration. This milestone, just one of many over the course of his life and his 40 plus year career in atmospheric science, demonstrates Dr. Gray's resiliency and determination to continue on with his research after countless years of commitment to the department and to atmospheric science in general.

    Over the years, Dr. Gray has seen many changes. From the inception of his career at the University of Chicago where he graduated from the Department of Geophysical Sciences in 1974, to his work here at CSU in the early days of the department during the 1960s, to his specialization in the global aspects of tropical cyclones throughout the entire course of his career, to him earning his emeritus status while the department developed into one of the premier atmospheric science research departments in the country, a lot has changed. With these changes, Dr. Gray has seen it all and the department is pleased to still see him with us each day. Once again, Happy Birthday Dr. Gray and thank you for all your contributions.

    Dr. Gray opening presents
    birthday cake - shows a hurricane and track over florida

    September 24, 2014: Zitely Tzompa Receives Sjostrom Family Scholarship

    Zitely Tzompa
    Zitely Tzompa

    Ph.D. student Zitely Tzompa, whose advisor is Professor Sonia Kreidenweis, was recently honored by the College of Engineering with the Sjostrom Family Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded each year to a graduate student demonstrating academic excellence and a desire to help improve the quality of life for those in less developed countries via research or professional goals. This award, therefore, was a perfect fit for Zitely with her focus on her home country of Mexico and the environmental issues that affect the population there.

    Zitely, whose thesis was titled "Contribution Of Biomass Burning To Carbonaceous Aerosols In Mexico City During May 2013", focused her Master's work on air quality impacts in Mexico City as a result of wildfires in a given time period. This research, designed and conducted in conjunction with the help of several stakeholders from the Mexican government, directly reflects the importance of air quality and what a concern it is to the people of Mexico City and for Zitely as well, who personally and professionally has a commitment to help her country improve life for everyone in it. Zitely, who began her Ph.D. program this year, will continue her air quality research as she progresses in her academic career at CSU. The department would like to congratulate Zitely on an award well deserved and commend her on her efforts to help society through research, demonstrating that one person can really make a difference.

    September 11, 2014: Cans Around the Oval October 21 - October 22

    Cans around the oval

    Fall is right around the corner and that means the 2014 CSU Cans Around the Oval Campaign is in full swing. Spearheading the department/CIRA efforts this year is FORTCAST, the local chapter of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) whose membership includes students to community members interested in atmospheric science.

    Last year, a total of 275 pounds of food was donated from the Atmospheric Science Foothills Campus and this year the goals are set even higher, which is essential when one reviews Food Bank statistics. In 2013, the Food Bank distributed over 9 million pounds of food to Larimer County residents. In a recent study by the Food Bank and Feeding America, statistics reveal that 1 in 10 people, or an estimated 35,600 people in Larimer County, turn to the Food Bank and partner food pantries and meal services programs to feed their families, so the need is great.

    With this in mind, FORTCAST has set a goal of collecting 375 pounds of food and collecting a total of $200 in monetary donations. Want to help??? Here's how you can contribute.

    1. Donate non-perishable items of food to the brown boxes located in the following locations:
      • ACRC break area and
      • ATS 1st floor break area,
      • ATS West lower-level break area,
      • Atmos. Chemistry break area,
      • CIRA lower-level break area

      (Highly needed items are: Canned Tomato Products (not Ketchup), Canned fruit, Peanut butter, Tuna and Meals in a Can (ie: Ravioli, Chili, Spaghetti O's, Canned Foods with Meat/Protein. NOT SOUP!).

    2. Make a cash donation online at: http://www.slice.colostate.edu/donate-to-food-bank.aspx (Indicate CSU Department of Atmospheric Science as the group you are donating on behalf of.)

    Monetary donation provide more meals than actual food donations. The Food Bank estimates that $1 can feed a family of four!

    Collection Day for boxes will be on October 21st which will come sooner than you think! Donations go to the Oval on Wednesday, October 22nd. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact Melissa Burt or simply visit Cans Around the Oval.

    September 11, 2014: FORTCAST First Meeting September 30

    FORT Collins Atmospheric ScientisTs (FORTCAST), northern Colorado's local chapter of the AMS, will be having their first meeting of the Fall 2014 semester coming up on Tuesday, September 30. This meeting will be held in ATS 101 from 12:15-12:45pm and will include an introduction of officers and a discussion of ideas for the upcoming year. In addition, FORTCAST Officers will discuss a new format for the quarterly meetings which will include the addition of public lectures to be held at local venues.

    Not a member? Keep in mind anyone can participate!!!

    FORTCAST is a local chapter of AMS that includes students, postdocs, research scientists, faculty, weather weenies and community members, so come join in the fun and become a member today. It's free to join and you can sign up anytime!!!

    Hope to see you at the first meeting.

    September 5, 2014: Walter Hannah Receives NSF Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

    Walter Hannah

    Congratulations to Ph.D. Atmospheric Science graduate Walter Hannah for receiving an NSF Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. Walter, who graduated Summer 2014, is currently on a postdoctoral assignment at the University of Miami with Professor Brian Mapes. He will be moving to North Carolina State this upcoming Spring to work with Professor Anantha Aiyyer whose teaching and research focuses on tropical meteorology, atmospheric dynamics and climate variability. It is this research focus that Walter was drawn to.

    Walter's research proposal involved future African weather variability and how that weather will impact future hurricane activity. Dr. Aiyyer specializes in African Easterly Wave (AEW) dynamics, which is specifically the reason Walter chose to work with him. AEWs often serve as precursor disturbances for tropical storms and hurricanes. So, given the uncertainty of future Atlantic hurricane activity, Walter was interested in addressing the issue by looking into how AEW activity will change with enhanced CO2 concentrations. What sets this study apart from many other climate change studies is that it will use a super-parameterized model, that was first developed at CSU. Former Atmospheric Science student, Rachel McCrary-Ph.D. 2012, showed that this type of model produces a very realistic simulation of the African summer monsoon, making it one of the best candidates for studying future impacts of CO2, and how they might influence Atlantic hurricane activity.

    The department wishes Walter much success in his new research assignment.

    September 3, 2014

    Assistant Professor Emily Fischer Leads NSF Grant to Bolster Women in Science

    Atmospheric Science Assistant Professor Emily Fischer is quite literally trying to change the face of the Earth Sciences. Fischer is the lead investigator on a $1.7 million dollar NSF project aimed at recruiting female undergraduates to the Earth Sciences through a combination of traditional in person and on-line peer mentoring. Her NSF project specifically focuses on closing the gender gap between men and women in fields that encompass atmospheric science, natural resource management, mining and geology, just to name a few.

    Fischer's goal, along with that of her team members from various universities from across the country, is to start a pilot program in 2015 that recruits first year female students from CSU, CU-Boulder, and the University of Wyoming. These students will attend an educational and scientific career workshop. After that, these ladies will have access to peer web support and will also have the opportunity to receive individual mentoring from members of the local Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN), which is a non-profit organization. There are currently more than 70 women involved in ESWN in the Front Range, and many of them are here at CSU. The team will run a parallel program in the Carolinas to learn what works in different regions.

    Fischer is thrilled to begin this project. "There are so many reasons to address diversity issues across the Earth Sciences. Our community's diversity issue has negative implications for innovation and could limit the social relevance of our science. Increasing women's participation in the geosciences is also an issue of social justice - STEM occupations have higher median earnings than the national average. I am so excited that CSU will lead both in the science and in this critical aspect of workforce development."

    Additional information on Fischer's program can be found at Today@Colorado State.

    September 2, 2014

    FORTCAST (FORT Collins Atmospheric ScientisTs AMS chapter), the local chapter of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) whose members include not only students from the Department of Atmospheric Science, but Northern Colorado community members interested in atmospheric science as well, was recently honored with a feature article in the Summer/Fall 2014 Local Chapter Affairs newsletter. This newsletter, produced on a quarterly basis, was created to provide a connection between local AMS chapters and ultimately, a link to the national chapter headquarters too. As a result, each newsletter highlights information from across the country, with this quarter's spotlight on the activities taking place in Northern Colorado. From participation at last year's Fort Collins Museum of Discovery's Earth Day, to multiple years of participation at the Little Shop of Physics Open Houses, to last years successful Young Scientists Symposium on Atmospheric Research (YSSAR). This year's YSSAR event will be held on Oct. 10th. FORTCAST members are active and seeking out new ways for students and community members to expand and share their knowledge of the atmosphere. It's an open forum for those that enjoy atmospheric science and the local chapter invites anyone with an interest to get involved. Visit them on their website, Facebook page or on their Twitter account and become a member today.

    FORTCAST Executive Board Officers Dr. Matt Rogers and Ph.D. student Rob Nelson worked with young "up and coming" scientists at this year's Little Shop of Physics Open House held in February.

    August 28, 2014

    Ph.D. students Ali Boris and Adam Rydbeck were each awarded a NSF EAPSI (East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes) Fellowship on June 1, 2014. NSF, and several of their foreign science and technology counterparts, sponsor international research institutes for U.S. graduate students in seven East Asian and Pacific locations during the summer months. Awards are granted based on proposal submissions from students that includes a collaborative research project proposal with research specifically taking place in one of the seven sponsoring foreign countries. With this award, students receive travel to the host location, a stipend, and participation in a pre-departure orientation. The goals of this program are for students to receive a first hand research experience, an introduction to scientific policy and infrastructure and a new cultural experience. Based on their scientific research, Ali and Adam travelled to very different locations.

    Ali traveled to South Korea where she worked with Dr. Taehyoung Lee of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, previously a group member with Professor Collett, on fog collection and chemistry at Baengnyeong Island in the Yellow Sea.

    Adam traveled to Asia as well, but his focus was in Taiwan where he worked with Dr. Chung-Hsiung Sui, a Professor of Tropical Meteorology at the National Taiwan University in Taipei. Adam's research focused on tropical cyclones and their precursor disturbances. Specifically, his reseach looked at the generation of precursor disturbances from particular atmospheric waves. The goal of this research is to ultimately improve forecasts of tropical cyclone formation.

    The department would like to congratulate both of these students on their outstanding work. Their experiences gained in the field will not only help in their future research, but will help the department as well, as they share with their colleagues the knowledge they've gained abroad.

    Ali in front of a size-fractionating Caltech Active Strand Cloudwater Collector (CASCC), as it collects fog during a high liquid water content event at Baengnyeong Island.
    Ali working in the lab on chemical analyses at the National Institute of Environmental Research Atmospheric Research Station at Baengnyeong Island. This is where fog samples were prepared for storage.
    Adam Rydbeck shows off his new found Chinese calligraphy skills acquired in June during his EAPSI orientation week.

    August 22, 2014

    Professor Eric Maloney Named Outstanding Professor of the Year

    Professor Eric Maloney

    Each year, one of the key highlights of the New Student Picnic is, of course, meeting the new students. The department warmly welcomed all 12 of them (one could not be in attendance) on Aug. 22nd and learned a little more about each of them through introductions by their professors. It is these same professors that held the key to the other eagerly awaited highlight of the picnic which was the announcement of the recipient of the Outstanding Professor of the Year Award. Each year, graduate student representatives poll department students on their thoughts regarding their interactions with faculty. After reviewing the results, one faculty member is chosen for the award based on a majority response.

    This year, as in last year's case as well with Associate Professor Sue van den Heever, a repeat winner was announced. For the second time in his career with the Department of Atmospheric Science, Professor Eric Maloney was named Outstanding Professor of the Year. Unfortunately, Eric was on travel during the picnic and wasn't here to receive the award and accolades in person, but student graduate representatives taped the announcement and e-mailed it to him instead. Eric graciously accepted and thanked everyone for this prestigious honor. Student comments on Eric included..."very approachable outside of class"..."Comprehensive, understandable and well organized notes. Covers an incredible amount of material in a semester and in a way that builds knowledge and understanding progressively."..."Lectures were never boring and I always enjoyed learning in this class. Eric's enthusiasm for teaching made it really easy to learn and be interested. He was always available to help and answer any questions outside of the classroom".

    The department would like to congratulate Eric on his well deserved award and look forward to his return in the near future.

    August 22, 2014

    Welcome New Atmospheric Science Students

    On August 22nd, the Department of Atmospheric Science held its annual New Student Picnic at Spring Canyon Park in Fort Collins. All Atmospheric Science Faculty, Students, Staff and Employees were invited to attend. This year, as in the past, faculty were introduced and in turn, they presented their new students to the department. In addition to this, the prestigious Outstanding Professor of the Year Award was presented to Professor Eric Maloney, general announcements were made, and the department then enjoyed an afternoon that included lunch and recreational activites. Bringing the department together for this event each year is beneficial, as it gives everyone the chance to interact and meet each other. It demonstrates the cohesiveness that exists in the department and ultimately is a great way to kickoff the upcoming school year.

    Pictured L to R back row: Casey Patrizio, Brian Crow*, Dakota Smith, Ed Charlesworth, Bryan Mundhenk, Will Lassman and Steven Brey
    L to R front row: Yoonjin Lee, Yixing Shao, Jingyuan Li, and Anna Hodshire
    New student not pictured above:
    Travis Ashby

    * Spring 2014 Admission

    August 8, 2014

    Ashley Evanoski-Cole

    Ashley Evanoski-Cole, Ph.D. student of Professor Jeff Collett, was awarded an EPA STAR (Science to Achieve Results) Fellowship this last week. This prestigious fellowship award supports masters and doctoral candidates in environmental studies. Fifteen hundred STAR fellowships have been awarded since the program began in 1995 and students can pursue traditional degrees, as well as disciplines that range from urban and regional planning to social anthropology. Ashley's two year fellowship award was based on her topic "Air, Climate and Energy: Clean Air". Her proposed research was titled "Characterizing Total Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition in National Parks in the Western United States."

    The department would like to congratulate Ashley on her award. Her research work is outstanding and the awarding of this fellowship clearly demonstrates her commitment to hard work and excellence.

    July 23, 2014

    Russ Schumacher

    Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher was named the Department of Atmospheric Science Interim Graduate Student Counselor for the upcoming 2014-2015 year, while Professor Sonia Kreidenweis is on sabbatical leave. Sonia has filled this position for multiple years and her commitment to our graduate students has created a solid foundation for Russ to work with during her absence. As Russ stated, "The graduate students in our department are always extremely well qualified and come from diverse scientific backgrounds. I look forward to working with the current students as well as the outstanding applicants that seek to join our program in the next year."

    For more information on the department's graduate school program visit http://www.atmos.colostate.edu/indexLists/prospectiveStudents.php

    July 2, 2014

    Interns from CMMAP, SOARS and NOAA participated in a mid-day visit to the Department of Atmospheric Science on Friday, June 27th. This event, which has occurred on a regular basis over the last few years, allows undergraduate interns interested in a graduate education the opportunity to visit the Department of Atmospheric Science and get a feel for what is expected in a graduate school environment. During their visit, undergraduate interns had the chance to visit with current Atmospheric Science students Aaron Piña (Graduate Student Rep.), Annareli Morales (Graduate Student Rep.), Gus Alaka and Brandon Wolding. These graduate students fielded questions and graduate students Aaron Piña, Peter Marinescu and Eliott Foust led interns on a ATS campus tour as well.

    In addition to this, undergraduate interns were provided a buffet lunch and then listened intently to a presentation given by Department Head (Professor) Jeff Collett and Graduate Student Counselor (Professor) Sonia Kreidenweis. Professor Collett welcomed the interns to the department and Professor Kreidenweis gave a graduate school overview with regards to the application process. Profs. Collett, Kreidenweis, Randall, Denning and Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher then fielded questions and gave advice and tips to the interns regarding applications and how best to prepare themselves for graduate school. After this, undergraduate interns had the privilege of sitting in on a seminar given by Professor Dave Randall. Professor Randall's presentation, titled Climate Change on the Back of An Envelope, covered predictions of anthropogenic global warming based on very simple physics. He went on to discuss how feedbacks add complexity. He also included the effects of clouds in some detail and briefly described the activities of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Professor Randall wrapped up his presentation by fielding questions and the undergraduate interns were on their way after this, taking with them valuable knowledge they can use in their future graduate school endeavors.

    interns visit 1
    Left-to-right, top-to-bottom: Professors Sonia Kreidenweis and Jeff Collett; Professor Scott Denning
    Associate Professor Russ Schumacher; Graduate Coordinator Jamie Schmidt and Professor Dave Randall
    interns visit 2
    Left-to-right, top-to-bottom: some visiting interns, Annareli Morales speaking to an intern
    Professor Sonia Kreidenweis in front of the room of visiting interns

    June 27, 2014

    Summer is a very busy time of the year at CMMAP for many reasons. One of which is the the much anticipated arrival of the summer interns. For the last eight years, CMMAP's undergraduate internship program has been bringing fresh faces and ideas to the Department of Atmospheric Science. CMMAP interns participate in a 10 week program where they join world-class atmospheric scientists investigating the science of clouds, climate and climate change, weather, and modeling. During the course of the program, interns have the opportunity to attend scientific seminars, visit National Scientific Laboratories and participate in a variety of professional development.

    For more information on CMMAP's Summer Internship Program: http://www.cmmap.org/scienceEd/internships.html

    2014 CMMAP Interns
    Top Row (L-R): Michael DiRosa, Rachel Severson, Renee Duff, Lauren Deanes, Julia Shates, Jessica Ng, Michael Cheeseman, Bryce Currey
    Bottom Row (L-R): Franchesa Espinosa, Sara Callahan, Andrea Jenney, Brian Matilla

    June 25, 2014

    This summer, the department's student chapter of AAAR (American Association for Aerosol Research) and FORTCAST (FORT Collins Atmospheric ScientsTs), a local chapter of AMS (American Meteorological Society), will again sponsor BBQs during the months of June, July and August. A total of four BBQs will take place out on the ATS/ACRC patio and all proceeds from these events will be donated to the School is Cool program. School is Cool , a CSU outreach program, raises money year round to purchase school supplies and backpacks for K-12 students. During the month of August, about 150 volunteers give their time to stuff backpacks with grade appropriate supplies. These backpacks are then distributed to families in the Poudre School District.

    The first of the summer BBQs has already taken place, and the turn out last Friday was fantastic. AAAR and FORTCAST would like to thank those that participated and encourage those who are in the department on future BBQ days to participate if they can. You'll receive a great meal, help a good cause, and have the opportunity to engage with AAAR and AMS FORTCAST members and learn about each group's individual goals. Find out if joining one of these groups is right for you. Each group focuses on various aspects of atmospheric science and climate, but in addition to this, they also believe in community outreach and communicating science to the general public.

    Interested in BBQs....and Helping out School is Cool?

    Join AAAR and FORTCAST at the upcoming BBQ dates below:

    Wed., July 2nd
    Fri., July 18th
    Fri., Aug. 1st

    11:30-12:30 on the ATS/ACRC Patio

    Plates are $5 and include a main entree, chips and a drink. All net proceeds go to the School is Cool Program

    You can RSVP for the lunches at the following website (http://goo.gl/nTImVF) during the week leading up to the BBQ, and reminders will be sent about these lunches on the ats-social listserve.

    Thanks for your support!!!!

    Atmos folks enjoying the AAAR/FORTCAST BBQ

    June 24, 2014

    During the weekend of June 15th and 16th, four members of CSUs chapter of AAAR (American Association of Aerosol Research) volunteered with Poudre Wilderness Volunteers to help restore the Lion Gulch Trail located on Highway 36 between Lyons and Estes Park. This trail, one of many hiking/horse trails in Larimer County, was destroyed during last year's September floods. Countless man hours are needed for area trail restoration and AAAR volunteers Robin Stevens, Alex Naegele, Peter Marinescu and Leah Lindsey assisted with the work effort as part of AAAR's commitment to connect with the local community. CSUs university student chapter of AAAR seeks to promote the exploration of aerosol science within and outside the university. They also work to promote it with the public as well through education and planned community events where topics such as air quality and climate change have a direct impact on human health and prosperity. Participating in community events such as the Lion Gulch Trail restoration are two-fold as it allows AAAR volunteers to share their scientific knowledge with the people they work beside and, at the same time, directly helps the community through needed physical labor that leads to improvements and one day, final trail restoration. This isn't the first year that AAAR volunteers have taken on this challenge, as AAAR also adopted the Kreutzer Nature Trail in 2013 after the Highland Park Fire. Prior to that, they also adopted the Blue Lake Trail and performed maintenance from 2010 to 2012. Students in AAAR (http://www.atmos.colostate.edu/aaar/links.html) look forward to many more outreach opportunities in the near future and invite you to visit their website for more information.

    trail maintenance volunteers
    Robin Stevens, Alex Naegele, Peter Marinescu and Leah Lindsey

    June 11, 2014

    Russ Schumacher
    Russ Schmacher

    Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher received the distinction of being featured recently in the March 2014 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS). Russ was asked earlier in the year to contribute a piece to the magazine by Ph.D. student Chris Slocum, a member of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Board of Early Career Professionals that was established from a subcommittee in 2012. Chris, appointed to the board in February 2012, is in charge of "The Highlight" section of the magazine. "The Highlight" is a bi-monthly feature directed at providing outreach information and advise to early career professionals. Given the success Russ has had at CSU, and the fact that he is still in the earlier stages of his career as a professor, he was perfect for providing advise to those following in his footsteps.

    Read about Russ and his advice for young professionals... (PDF)

    June 5, 2014

    Andrea Clements, Postdoctoral Fellow mentored by Professor Jeff Collett, and Hannakaisa Lindqvist, Postdoctoral Researcher mentored by Assistant Professor Chris O'Dell, were named 2014-2015 SoGES Global Sustainability Leadership Fellows last week.

    SoGES Global Sustainability Leadership Fellows are a select group of leading CSU senior Ph.D. candidates and Postdoctoral Fellows interested in communicating their science to media and the public. Over the course of one year, these fellows receive state-of-the-art training in environmental communication and professional development skills. Fellows are selected on a competitive basis, including their current sustainability science research and their interest in communicating important scientific concepts to broad audiences.

    Andrea, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Collett research group, completed her Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University in 2012. Andrea's current work involves the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during the drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and flowback stages of natural gas well development in Colorado. This project aims to quantify emissions from the well pad activities. Andrea assists with field observations including the real-time measurement of methane and whole-air canister sampling for laboratory analysis. She also conducts GC-FID and GC-MS analysis of the canister samples to identify and quantify VOCs.

    In the SoGES program she looks forward to workshops aimed at enhancing professional skills such as grant writing, effective leadership, and networking. In addition to this, Andrea is also excited about discussing how scientists can impact the world through effective communication with the public and media not only about the importance of their own scientific work, but also how the conclusions they draw might shape policy on local, national and global scales.

    Hannakaisa, currently a Postdoctoral Researcher in the O'Dell Research Group, completed her Ph.D. in physics at the University of Helsinki in 2013. She is currently studying the carbon cycle through remote sensing measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide. In the SoGES program, she looks forward to seeing different perspectives on climate change brought by this multidisciplinary company of other young scientists.

    In winning these honors, Andrea and Hannakaisa have demonstrated their professionalism and their commitment to atmospheric science research. The Department is very impressed with their work and proud of the example they set for others here at CSU.

    Andrea Clements
    Hannakaisa Lindqvist

    May 30, 2014

    Congratulations to Ph.D. graduates Jason (Brant) Dodson and Misha Schurman who were recently honored with postdoctoral assignments.

    Brant was accepted into the NASA postdoctoral program and will be taking an assignment at the NASA Langley Research Center, while Misha accepted an offer for a postdoctoral position at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

    The Department is very proud of these two graduates and wishes them success in all their future endeavors.

    Brant Dodson
    Misha Schurman

    May 30, 2014

    Bill Gray

    Congratulations go out to Professor Emeritus Bill Gray, the recipient of the first Robert and Joanne Simpson Award presented at the 2nd Annual National Tropical Weather Conference held at South Padre Island, Texas last month.

    This award, established by a conference committee in honor of Bob and Joanne Simpson's numerous decades of work in tropical meteorology, was given to Dr. Gray "in honor of his outstanding contribution to tropical meteorology and his distinguished role in pioneering the first seasonal hurricane forecast."

    Receiving this award was very personal for Dr. Gray, as he collaborated with Bob and Joanne since the last 1950's and they helped mentor him in his early career. In addition to this, Dr. Gray continued to have a long professional and personal association with them for decades afterward. As Dr. Gray stated, "I'm proud to have received this award in Bob and Joanne's honor. They both had an important and beneficial influence on my career."

    The Department, once again, congratulates Dr. Gray for this recognition and his endless years of service to the atmospheric science community and the department.

    May 27, 2014

    Libby Barnes

    The Department of Atmospheric Science is pleased to announce that Assistant Professor Elizabeth Barnes has just been selected to receive the American Geophysical Union's 2014 James R. Holton Award. The Holton Award is presented each year by the Atmospheric Science Section of the AGU to one early career scientist in recognition of outstanding scientific research and accomplishments in the field. A formal announcement of the award will be made in an upcoming issue of EOS; the award will be presented at the Atmospheric Science section banquet at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco.

    Congratulation, Libby, on this outstanding achievement!

    Update March 26, 2015: See the formal announcement in the EOS here.

    May 21, 2014

    Veljko Petkovic

    Congratulations go out to Veljko Petkovic for winning a 2014 NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship (NESSF) Award. Veljko was one of 719 individuals that applied for this NASA Fellowship that is directly related to the four research programs of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) at NASA Headquarters. (Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics Research)

    Representatives from the four divisions made fellowship offers based on scientific merit and the relevance of a candidate's research proposals to NASA's scientific goals. They also considered a candidate's academic excellence as well. Veljko's proposal, "Improving the Quality of Extreme Precipitation Estimates Using Satellite Passive Microwave Retrievals" fit all their parameters therefore, he was chosen and will receive a one year monetary award to assist him with his research. If approved, this award may be extended for a period of up to two more years as well.

    Congratulations again to Veljko. Your research is outstanding and you set a great example for other students in this department with your work.

    May 19, 2014

    Congratulations go out to our recent Department of Atmospheric Science Graduates and M.S./Ph.D. Candidates, several who walked in Commencement Ceremonies on Friday, May 16th.

    The Department would like to recognize the Graduates and M.S./Ph.D. Candidates for their achievements and hard work. The dedication they have shown to their research and the Department is remarkable. Graduation brings new opportunities to each of them and we wish them good luck and continued success in their future career paths.

    Graduates/M.S. Ph.D. Candidates Include:
    Becky Bolinger*Ph.D.Advisor: Professor Chris Kummerow
    Steve BrownPh.D.Advisor: Professor and Department Head Jeff Collett
    Brant DodsonPh.D.Advisor: Professor Dave Randall
    Kim EricksonM.S.Advisors: Professor Tom Vonder Haar and Professor Chris Kummerow
    Eliott Foust*M.S.Advisor: Professor Dave Thompson
    Brody FuchsM.S.Advisor: Professor Steven Rutledge
    Leah GrantM.S.Advisor: Associate Professor Sue van den Heever
    Walter Hannah*Ph.D.Advisor: Associate Professor Eric Maloney
    Josh KingM.S.Advisors: Associate Professor Sue van den Heever and Professor Chris Kummerow
    Ahmad SammanM.S.Advisor: Professor Bill Cotton
    Misha SchurmanPh.D.Advisor: Professor and Department Head Jeff Collett
    Chris Slocum**Ph.D.Advisor: Professor Wayne Schubert
    Zitely Tzompa*M.S.Advisor: Professor Sonia Kreidenweiss
    Vanessa VincenteM.S.Advisor: Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher
    Brandon Wolding**M.S.Advisor: Associate Professor Eric Maloney

    * Anticipated Graduation Summer 2014
    ** Fall 2013 M.S. Graduate, now Ph.D. Student

    Graduates, M.S./Ph.D. Candidates and their families were invited to a graduate luncheon with faculty before the commencement ceremonies took place.

    Graduate and M.S./Ph.D. Candidates at Graduate Luncheon: (Left to Right, Back Row): Ahmad Samman, Vanessa Vincente, Chris Slocum, and Brody Fuchs
    (Left to Right, Front Row): Zitely Tzompa, Misha Schurman, and Leah Grant

    May 14, 2014

    Matt Igel
    Matt Igel

    Matt Igel, Ph.D. student of Associate Professor Susan van den Heever, was awarded a NSF AGS (Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences) Postdoctoral Fellowship Award this last week. This prestigious award is given to 10 Ph.D. students annually (contingent upon availability of funds) who are within 3 years of obtaining their degree. This award recognizes a student's investigative qualities and allows them to carry out an independent research program and address scientific questions within the scope of AGS disciplines. Matt will begin to fulfill his award this September by spending a year at the University of Melbourne where he will be collaborating with Professor Todd Lane. After that, Matt will move on to the University of Miami where he will spend a year with Professor Brian Mapes. Matt will be running cloud resolving models to try to explain an observed characteristic of tropical deep convection.

    The Department would like to congratulate Matt on receiving this distinguished award. Your research capabilities are outstanding and you set a great example for other students in winning this award.

    May 12, 2014

    Congratulations go out to Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher who used his prowess as a trivia expert to make it through another successful round of Jeopardy! "Battle of the Decades" on Tuesday evening. Russ will continue on in the tournament and will make his next appearance on Monday, May 12th.

    Broadcast will be on Channel 7 at 6pm in Colorado, so please tune in and continue to support Russ in all his efforts.

    Visit the Jeopardy site for a list of this week's quarterfinal matchups and winners.

    May 8, 2014

    Adele Igel
    Adele Igel

    Adele Igel, Ph.D. student of Associate Professor Susan van den Heever, was awarded the NSF GROW (Graduate Research Opportunities Worldwide) Award on May 8th. This award, only open to NSF GRFP (Graduate Research Fellowship Program) recipients, awards the winner with support for a visit to an international institution to conduct research for 3 to 6 months during their Ph.D. program. Adele will be traveling to Stockholm University in Sweden next year to work with Dr. Annica Ekman and her group on research related to Arctic stratus clouds. NSF will provide support for roundtrip travel and expenses for Adele, while NSF's counterpart in Sweden will provide a housing stipend as well.

    The Department congratulates Adele on this outstanding award and wishes her the best of luck with her overseas experience next year.

    May 6, 2014

    Master's Candidate Leah Grant and Ph.D. Candidate Sarah Ringerud Receive Outstanding Department Honors at the Herbert Riehl Memorial Award/Alumni Award Ceremony

    Congratulations go out to Master's candidate Leah Grant and Ph.D. candidate Sarah Ringerud for receiving distinguished honors this week at the annual Herbert Riehl Memorial Award/Alumni Ceremony held on Tuesday, May 6th.

    Leah, a Master's student of Associate Professor Sue van den Heever, received the Herbert Riehl Memorial Award based on her submitted manuscript titled, "Microphysical and Dynamical Characteristics 2 of Low-Precipitation and Classic Supercells" (L. Grant and S. van den Heever). Sarah, a Ph.D. candidate of Professor Chris Kummerow, received the Alumni Award based on two submitted manuscripts titled, "A Comparison of Microwave Window Channel Retrieved and Forward-Modeled Emissivities over the US Southern Great Plains" (S. Ringerud, C.D. Peters-Lidard, C. Kumerow, Y. Tian and K. Harrison) and " A Semi-Empirical Model for Computing Land Surface Emissivity in the Microwave Region" (S. Ringerud, C. Kummerow, and C.D. Peters-Lidard).

    The granting of both of these awards is based on faculty nominations and a committee decision. The Herbert Riehl Memorial Award is awarded to a current Master's Degree candidate or a student in the Ph.D. program for less than one year. The student must have obtained their M.S. degree from our Department and have submitted a technical manuscript for publication during the previous eighteen-month period. The Alumni Award is given to a senior Ph.D. candidate who has passed the preliminary exam and has submitted at least one paper to the peer-reviewed literature based on their dissertation work.

    Both ladies presented their research after receiving their awards and thanked the department for acknowledging their research work. The department would like to congratulate Leah and Sarah again for their hard work and recognize them for their outstanding achievement.

    Leah and Sarah recieving the Rhiel award
    Left to right: Professor Jeff Collett, Herbert Riehl, Jr., Leah Grant,
    Associate Professor Sue van den Heever, Sarah Ringerud, Prof. Chris Kummerow

    May 6, 2014

    On Tuesday May 6th, at the Herbert Riehl Memorial Award/Alumni Awards Ceremony, the Atmospheric Science Department thanked and recognized student tour volunteers that help throughout the 2014 recruiting season. Their assistance with prospective student visits was invaluable, especially to Graduate Coordinator Jamie Schmidt. "Prospective student interaction with our current students is critical to our recruiting success". Our students are a direct reflection of the high standards of this department. Only they can give insight to a prospective student as to why this is a top ranked graduate program." Volunteers included: Aryeh Drager, Erik Nielsen, Nick Beavis, Vandana Jha, Zitely Tzompa, Brett Basarab, Ali Boris, Annareli Morales, Aaron Piña, Leah Grant, Erin Dagg, Gavin Roy, James Ruppert, Brad Wells and Steve D'Andrea.

    In addition to this, Nick Davis was also recognized for his help with organizing student participation in colloquium lunches.

    Once again, the Department would like to thank all the students for their help. By volunteering, and going above and beyond what is expected of you, it demonstrates your commitment to this Department and your potential future classmates as well.

    Left to right: Erik Nielsen, Aryeh Drager, Vandana Jha, Zitely Tzompa, Ali Boris, Brett Basarab, Annareli Morales, Aaron Piña, Leah Grant
    Nick Davis

    May 6, 2014

    Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher to Appear Next Week in the Quarterfinal Round of Jeopardy's Battle of the Decades.

    Here we go again!!! After successfully winning his first round game in Jeopardy's Battle of the Decades, Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher will make a return appearance next week in the tournament's quarterfinal round. His game will be broadcast locally on channel 7 at 6pm on Tuesday, May 6th. We encourage all of you to tune in and root for Russ as he tries to continue his winning ways.

    See promotional footage of Jeopardy's Battle of the Decades Quarterfinal Rounds.

    May 5, 2014

    Yi Li Receives Another National A&WMA Scholarship Award

    Yi Li
    Yi Li

    Six months after receiving the Air & Wast Management Association (A&WMA) Air Quality Heroes Award (that also included a scholarship award), the Atmospheric Science Department is please to announce that Yi Li, Ph.D. student of Professor Jeff Collett, was honored again this week with an additional A&WMA scholarship award. Yi was recognized for his academic excellence, professionalism and his exceptional work in Air Quality Research and Study.

    A&WMA focuses on education with regards to air quality, waste management, and environmental, policy and law. Yi stated, "I am very grateful to be recognized again by A&WMA. My air quality research focuses on 'Trace gases emitted from oil/gas fields and agriculture and their relationship with ambient particulate matters and regional nitrogen disposition,' and I'm pleased that A&WMA acknowledges the importance of my research work."

    Congratulations to Yi for his hardwork and research dedication.

    April 29, 2014

    Paul Ciesielski Recognized as a Distinguished CSU Administrative Professional (AP) Employee

    Paul Ciesielski
    Paul Ciesielski

    Paul Ciesielski, Senior Research Associate in the Department of Atmospheric Science, was recognized as a Distinguished CSU Administrative Professional (AP) Employee last week at CSU's Celebrate! Colorado State Awards Reception. Only 4 AP employees are recognized per year for their outstanding work in teaching, administration, service and/or outreach. Paul was honored for his strong record of scholarship and his many contributions to improving the collection and analysis of atmospheric sounding data. For his efforts, Paul received a $1,000 award and a commemorative plaque. The Department would like to congratulate Paul on his achievements and his consummate contributions to the Department of Atmospheric Science.

    To see a list of other award receipitents, visit Today@ColoState.
    For more information on Paul, visit his research page.

    April 29, 2014

    Professor Sonia Kreidenweis named University Distinguished Professor

    Sonia Kreidenweis
    Sonia Kreidenweis

    Professor Sonia Kreidenweis was named University Distinguished Professor (UDP) last week at the Celebrate! Colorado State Awards Reception. This honor was granted to Sonia in recognition of her outstanding scholarship and achievement and is restricted to approximately 1% of the CSU faculty. Specifically, Sonia was recognized for her research involving atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on cloud formation, haze and climate. Sonia is only the 4th member of the ATS faculty to be designated as a UDP following Professor Tom Vonder Haar, Professor Emeritus Graeme Stephens and Professor Dave Randall. The Department would like to congratulate Professor Kreidenweis on her outstanding achievements and acknowledge her for her superlative contributions to the Department of Atmospheric Science.

    To see a list of other award receipitents, visit Today@ColoState
    Prof. Kreidenweis's research page

    April 25th, 2014

    CMMAP and Little Shop of Physics successfully participate in the 3rd Annual USA Science and Engineering Festival

    Melissa Burt, CMMAPP Education and Diversity Manger, and members of The Little Shop of Physics successfully participated in the 3rd Annual USA Science and Engineering Festival from April 25th-27th. Melissa stated, "we had a fantastic time at USA Science & Engineering Festival!! We saw over 10,000 people in three days and helped demonstrate hands on science to children and adults alike. Participating in this event was a great experience and we'd like to thank the National Science Foundation (NSF) for making this possible!"

    Little Shop of Physics Booth
    Left to Right: Sheila Ferguson,* Melissa Burt, Adam Pearlstein,*
    Sean Beal,* and Heather Michalak.*
    (* from Little Shop of Physics)

    April 25, 2014

    CMMAP participates in the 3rd Annual USA Science and Engineering Expo with the Little Shop of Physics.

    Melissa Burt, CMMAP Education and Diversity Manager, will participate in the upcoming USA Science and Engineering Expo from April 25th-27th in Washington D.C. This festival, which began nationwide with school programs throughout 2013, culminates in a 2-day grand finale event with hands-on science and engineering activities for all ages. The Little Shop of Physics and CMMAP were invited to be part of the National Science Foundation booth. Over the course of the three day expo, thousands of people will work with the 50+ hands-on experiment stations that CMMAP will be shipping to Washington, D.C. This equates to two pallets worth of equipment and a half of ton of science fun. This will be one of the most ambitious efforts the group has ever taken on and their efforts will help to educate and inspire the future scientists of tomorrow.

    April 23, 2014

    CMMAP Participates in Annual 9News Weather and Science Day with the Little Shop of Physics.

    Last row, third from left, is Melissa Burt, CMMAP's Education and Diversity Manager

    The Little Shop of Physics will join 9News Weather Anchors at Coors Field for the Annual Weather and Science Day this coming Wednesday, April 23rd. This year, 150 Colorado State University undergraduates will work with approximately 15,000 K-12 students from around the Denver area, most from schools with diverse student populations. Each student in attendance will receive a packet of materials and information to take home to help further their scientific interests. The number of students participating this year will qualify the event for the Guinness Book of World Records. Expectations are that it will break the world record for the largest practical science lesson to date. This year, Connie Hale and Claire Fleming (CMMAP) have volunteered to participate in this event. Last year, CMMAP's Education and Diversity Manager Melissa Burt attended the event. CMMAP was selected to participate due to their work in educating local teacher and students in weather and climate.

    April 15, 2014

    Student Video Footage from CSU Field Campaign in Climate Change Documentary

    Graduate student Rob Nelson (advisor: Chris O'Dell) participated in a field campaign last June to do ground validation for the the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) mission. While there, he took some video (with his smartphone) of the Alpha Jet, equipped to measure vertical profiles of carbon dioxide and other traces gases. Rob was able to get some really nice footage of the Alpha Jet from the ground. Some of his footage has been used in the recent Showtime documentary Years of Living Dangerously, @1:07, and credits @58:21), which actually makes it appear that Harrison Ford was flying the jet that Rob filmed. Ford did, in fact, pilot the Alpha Jet for a mission on November 15, 2013!

    Photo Courtesy of Rob Nelson

    April 7, 2014

    Passing of Willis L. "Slim" Somervell Jr.

    Willis L. "Slim" Somervell, Jr.

    The Department of Atmospheric Science is sorry to announce that Willis L. "Slim" Somervell Jr., Retired Naval Captain (1944-1970), CSU Atmospheric Science Department Manager and Synoptic Weather Instructor in the 1970s, passed away this week on April 7th, less than 2 months shy of his 90th birthday.

    Prior to his time with CSU, Slim was for many years during the 1960s the head of the Navy's Weather Research Program in Norfolk, VA. and he generously helped our department in its early days with Navy sponsored weather research funding. In the 1980s, Slim worked at CSU with Dean Lionel Baldwin and the College of Engineering's SURGE (State University for Graduate Education) Program. Slim's enthusiasm and contributions to the department and the university were much appreciated by all and he will be dearly missed.

    Funeral arrangements for Slim have been made and details regarding dates and times can be found at the Bohlender Funeral Chapel

    April 3, 2014

    Congratulations to NSF Fellowship Recipient Erik Nielsen and NSF Fellowship Honorable Mention Greg Herman.

    Master's students Erik Nielsen and Greg Herman, advised by Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher, were both recognized this week by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Erik received a NSF Fellowship Award and Greg received a NSF Fellowship Honorable Mention for their fellowship application submissions. The 2014 fellowship competition was very competitive with over 14,000 applications received. Approximately 2,000 Fellowship Awards were presented, along with 2,000 Honorable Mentions. The department would like to congratulate both Erik and Greg on a job well done. You are great representatives for our department and have made us proud.

    Erik Nielsen
    Greg Herman

    April 3, 2014

    Congratulations Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher on his Jeopardy Victory

    Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher, our department's unofficial Jeopardy expert and 2004 Jeopardy Tournament of Champions Winner, made it through another round of Jeopardy Wednesday evening, beating out two other successful Jeopardy contestants, Larissa Kelly, a six time Season 25 winner, and Tom Kavanaugh, an eight time Season 22 winner. With this victory, Russ has now earned a place in the quarterfinals of the Battle of the Decades where he could go on to the finals and win a total of one million dollars. His next appearance will be sometime in May, so please stay tuned for more details to come.

    April 2, 2014

    Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher, a past Jeopardy! tournament winner and contestant in 2004 and 2005, will appear again on the popular trivia game show next week in a multi-level tournament called the Battle of the Decades. The Battle of the Decades, organized in honor of the show's 30th anniversary, pits contestants from the 80's, 90's and 2000's against each other in preliminary game show rounds. All the contestants are battling for a winning spot or wildcard position that will advance them to the championship finals that includes a $1,000,000 prize. Russ, who believed his game show days were behind him, was thrilled to be invited to make another appearance. At this point, he can't share the results with anyone, as all shows were taped earlier this year, but we'll soon find out how he did. Please tune in to watch our Russ in "trivia action" next Wednesday, April 2nd at 6pm on Channel 7. Russ we're all rooting for you!!!

    More information can be found on Jeopardy's website

    Assistant Professor Russ Schumacher with Alex Trebek on Jeopardy!

    March 20, 2014

    Brody Fuchs receiving Krider Scholarship

    Brody Fuchs received one of two Krider Scholarships awarded at the International Lightning and Meteorology Conference held 20-21 March 2014 in Tucson AZ. The award is made possible by Vaisala Inc. and recognizes the best scientific presentation by a graduate student. Brody received this honor for his presentation, Factors Affecting Lightning Behavior in Various Regions of the U.S. This award is presented in honor of the contributions made by Dr. Phil Krider (U. of Arizona) to the field of atmospheric electricity. The Krider awardee received a certificate and a cash prize. Brody is advised by Prof. Steven Rutledge.

    February 4, 2014

    January, 2014

    A. R. "Ravi" Ravishankara, new faculty member and researcher in the Department's of Atmospheric Science and Chemistry, arrived at CSU during the month of January.

    Ravi's research focuses on climate and ozone layer depletion along with air quality. To read highlights on Ravi's research, check out Today@Colorado State

    January 31, 2014

    CSU-CHILL Radar data for last night's snow event. The loop runs from 0200-1100 UTC on 31 January 2014. The first image is radar reflectivity and the second image is Doppler velocity. These data were taken with the CSU-CHILL's X-band component. The radar was operated all night in an unattended mode.

    Radar reflectivity
    Doppler velocity

    January 24, 2014

    Jeff Collett presenting a clock to Mark Demaria

    Mark DeMaria, Atmospheric Science Alumni (M.S. 1979 and Ph.D. 1983), and new Technology and Science Branch Chief of the NOAA/NWS National Hurricane Center, gave a colloquium presentation on January 24th, the first of the colloquium series for the Spring 2014 semester. The title of Mark's presentation was "Generalizing Tropical Cyclone Potential Intensity Estimates to Include Vertical Shear Effects".

    Once Mark's presentation was complete, Atmospheric Science Department Head Jeff Collett honored Mark with a 50th Anniversary Atmospheric Science Clock. These clocks have been presented to alumni speakers during the past two years and demonstrates the deep appreciation the department has for it's returning alumni.

    Thank You Mark for your presentation and Congratulations on your new position at NOAA/NWS National Hurricane Center.

    January, 2014

    Steve D'Andrea

    Atmospheric Science Student Stephen D'Andrea received an Outstanding Student Paper Award at the American Geographical Union's Annual Meeting in San Francisco in December 2013. Steve, who will be studying under Assistant Professor Jeff Pierce this coming semester, is focusing his research on the effect of secondary organic aerosol assumptions on global aerosol size distributions in past and present climates.

    The title of Steve's AGU presentation was "Understanding and constraining global secondary organic aerosol amount and size-resolved condensational behavior" [PDF].

    Congratulations Steve on your achievement.

    January, 2014

    This semester, Atmospheric Science welcomes two new students to our academic program.

    Brian Crow, a graduate of the University of Missouri, just arrived last week and will be studying for his M.S. under Professor Dave Thompson.

    Stephen D'Andrea, a visiting student with us last semester, graduated from Dalhousie University and will be studying for his Ph.D. under Associate Professor Jeff Pierce.

    We are pleased to have both of them join us and we welcome back all our returning students as well. Our faculty and staff wish you an exciting and productive spring semester, as you continue on your educational journey.

    Steve D'Andrea and Brian Crow

    January, 2014

    The Department of Atmospheric Science is pleased to announce that two students of Professor Jeff Collett, M.S. Student Brad Wells & Ph.D. student Yi Li, were awarded scholarships by the Rocky Mountain States Section of the Air and Waste Management Association (RMSS-AWMA).

    Yi Li received an Air Quality Heroes Award, while Brad Wells received an Air Quality Star Award. Both students received a monetary scholarship award, a 1 year student AWMA membership and an invite to the RMSS 2014 Conference.

    The Air & Waste Management Association (A&WMA), a nonprofit organization, provides a forum for the exchange of information in a neutral forum. Its mission is to support professional development, networking, outreach and public information in more than 65 countries. A&WMA promotes global environmental responsibility and increases the effectiveness of organizations to make critical decisions that benefit society.

    Congratulations to Brad and Yi. Your awards are well deserved.

    Brad Wells and Yi LI

    December 17, 2013

    On December 17th, the Department of Atmospheric Science held it's annual Atmospheric Awards and Recognition Ceremony/Luncheon. Years of Service, along with the 2013 Student & Post Doctoral Fellowship and Scholarship Award Winners were recognized.

    We'd like to take the time to congratulate all our award winners.

    The commitment of our students, post docs, faculty, researchers and staff are invaluable and make our department a cohesive unit that strives for excellence not only in academics and research, but in public outreach as well.

    Picture by Eliott Foust
    Student and Postdoctoral Awards
    Colorado State University Global Sustainability Leadership Fellow Matt Igel and Shunsuke Nakao
    Teaching Recognition Certificate from the UADY Engineering Department, Yucatan, Mexico Alex Gonzalez, Annareli Morales, and Gavin Roy
    6th International Fog Conference Outstanding Student (Oral) Presentation Award Ali Boris
    12th ACCESS Invited Participant (Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists) Shunsuke Nakao
    2013-AMS 19th Conference on Atmospheric and Ocean Fluid Dynamics Best Student Papers Alex Gonzalez and Nick Davis
    2013-AMS 93rd Annual Conference Student Poster Award Noel Hilliard and Peter Marinescu
    2012-AGU Fall Meeting Outstanding Student Paper Award Bonne Ford and Aryeh Drager
    Student and Postdoctoral Awards
    AFIT (Air Force Institute of Technology) Robert Tournay
    AGEP (Alliance for Graduate Education and Professoriate) Jordan Allen and Jake Zaragoza
    AMS (American Meteorological Society) Aryeh Drager, Caitlin Fine, Erik Nielsen, and Peter Marinescu
    CIRA (Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere) Leah Grant and Todd Jones
    CMMAP Diversity (Cen ter for Multiscale Atmosphere Processes) Noel Hilliard
    CONACYT (Mexican National Council for Science and Technology) Zitely Tzompa
    Dietrich Scholarship Steve Brown and Bonne Ford
    DOE (Department of Energy) Krell Chris Eldred
    GATES Millennium Scholars Isaac Medina
    I-WATER (Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems Education, and Research) Aaron Pina, Vanessa Vincente, and Isaac Medina
    NASA Matt Igel and Sara Ringerud
    NASA DEVELOP Renee Curry
    NSF (National Science Foundation) Shunsuke Nakao, Adele Igel, Leah Grant, Aryeh Drager, Nick Davis,
    Elizabeth Thompson, and Gavin Roy
    NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowship Nathan Arnold
    NSERC (Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada) Kim Sakamoto and Landan MacDonald
    PRSE (Programs for Research and Scholarly Excellence) Greg Herman
    Shrake Culler Scholarship Isaac Medina, Stephanie Henderson, and James Ruppert
    SOARS (Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science) Jake Zaragoza and Annareli Morales

    November, 2013

    John Albers

    John Albers was recently awarded a two-year National Science Foundation Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship (AGS-PRF). John's proposal was entitled "A Hierarchical Modeling Approach to Quantifying the Effects of Changes in Ozone and Solar Variability on the Brewer-Dobson Circulation and Tropospheric Climate". John will begin his fellowship in January and he will work jointly with Thomas Birner here at CSU and Judith Perlwitz at NOAA ESRL. He will also collaborate with Rolando Garcia at NCAR as well as Ed Gerber at New York University. Congratulations, John, on winning this prestigious award.

    November 11, 2013

    Dr. A.R. Ravishankara

    The Department of Atmospheric Science is pleased to announce that Dr. A.R. Ravishankara (Ravi) will be joining our faculty as a Professor in early 2014. Ravi is currently Director of the Chemical Sciences Division of the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder. He will be retiring from this position and will begin his work at CSU, where he'll hold a primary appointment in the Chemistry Department with a joint appointment in Atmospheric Science.

    Originally trained as a Physical Chemist, Ravi has worked on many problems in the area of atmospheric chemistry and coupling between atmospheric chemistry and climate issues. He's an internationally renowned, highly productive researcher and has a particular interest in issues at the interface of science and policy. Elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2000, Ravi is also a Fellow of several societies including AGU and AAAS, and has extensive experience on high-level, international scientific committees. At CSU, Ravi will be actively engaged in teaching and research, with courses to be offered both in Chemistry and Atmospheric Science.

    November 6, 2013

    Bonne Ford

    ATS Ph.D. student Bonne Ford was named today as the 2013 recipient of the Dietrich Scholarship award. This scholarship, named in honor of former Air Resource Specialists (ARS) President Dave Dietrich, is funded by ARS each year. The scholarship winner, chosen from faculty nominations, is selected based on an outstanding record of work (in the classroom and in research) in the field of air quality. Congratulations Bonne on your success. This recognition is well deserved.

    October 29, 2013

    Professor Wayne Schubert

    Professor Wayne Schubert was announced as this year's winner of the College of Engineering's Abell Outstanding Research Faculty Award at the all-college meeting held on October 29. This award recognizes high quality, nationally acclaimed research productivity with a particular focus on the preceding five-year time period. Wayne's continued record of outstanding research in the field of atmospheric dynamics made him a perfect candidate for the award. Over the past few years, Wayne has graduated several Ph.D. students, published numerous ground-breaking papers with his research group, and successfully directed several projects sponsored by NSF, NOAA, and ONR.

    Congratulations Wayne on all of your success!

    October 2013

    Colorado State University Professors Jeff Collett and Russ Schumacher are working with the Colorado Livestock Association to develop an early-warning system that will help reduce nitrogen pollution to Rocky Mountain National Park. One main culprit is ammonia, a byproduct of local agricultural practices, which can be transported to the park when certain weather patterns are in place. By knowing that these weather patterns are coming, local farmers and livestock managers can put their ammonia-producing practices temporarily on hold until the weather changes.

    Read all about it here.

    October 23, 2013

    Ph.D. student, Stephen D'Andrea has been named an International Presidential Fellow at Colorado State University. These fellows have strong international components and collaborations in their research. Steve's research involves understanding atmospheric aerosols globally, compiling measurements from around the world and running models of the global atmosphere. Steve, a Canadian, has ongoing collaborations with researchers from Finland, Sweden, the UK, Colombia, Canada and the US.

    October 22, 2013

    Melissa Burt, a Colorado State University Ph.D. student (advisor: Dave Randall), as well as the Education and Diversity Manager for CMMAP, has been appointed as the new Chair for the AMS Board on Women and Minorities. The Board on Women and Minorities is charged with examining workplace issues, including educational and professional opportunities, that affect those employed in the atmospheric and related sciences for all segments of the AMS, with special emphasis on women, minorities, and the disabled. Melissa brings a strong background and experience to the board.

    Congratulations Melissa!

    October 2013

    Ph.D. student Alex Gonzalez wins award for Excellent Journal Reviews.

    Colorado State University graduate student Alex Gonzalez has been selected to receive the 2012 Editors' Citation for Excellence in Refereeing for the Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems (JAMES). One of the most important services performed for the American Geophysical Union (AGU) is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. The purpose of this citation is to express publicly the gratitude of AGU to those whose reviews have been particularly commendable. Alex's contributions to the journals program have been invaluable in maintaining a high quality standard. An announcement is planned for publication in a future issue of Eos.

    "Are you a senior graduate student who has never reviewed a paper? Ask your advisor about contributing to the peer-review process today!"

    October 2013

    Nolan Doesken

    The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) has recently been selected to receive an American Meteorological Society Special Award "For building a community of over 15,000 volunteer observers dedicated to providing high quality, reliable observations of daily precipitation across the United States." Congratulations to CoCoRaHS Director Nolan Doesken and the entire CoCoRaHS team!

    CoCoRaHS logo

    September 30, 2013

    Professor Dave Randall

    Congratulations to Professor Dave Randall who has just been named as the 2014 recipient of the American Meteorological Society's (AMS) Jule G. Charney Award. This award, one of the highest honors bestowed by the AMS, is granted to individuals in recognition of highly significant research or development achievement in the atmospheric or hydrologic sciences. Dave's selection was given in recognition of his "transformative research into atmospheric convection and cloud processes and their improved representation in global weather and climate models." The award will be presented at the annual AMS meeting in Atlanta in early February.

    September 20, 2013

    The Young Scientist Symposium on Atmospheric Research, sponsored by the CSU student chapter of AASR and FortCAST, took place on, Friday September 20, 2013. Graduate students and young researchers in the region presented their atmospheric research in front of their local peers. All topics related to the atmosphere were invited.

    September 5th, 2013

    Congratulations to Professor Tom Vonder Haar and Professor Wayne Schubert for their recent AMS Appointments!

    Professor Vonder Haar was formally appointed as chair of the American Meteorological Society's History Committee this month. He will have a three-year term commencing at the annual AMS meeting in February 2014 in Atlanta, GA. Professor Schubert was also appointed to the American Meteorological Society's History Committee and his term will run the same length of time as well.

    Professor Tom Vonder Haar
    Professor Tom Vonder Haar
    Professor Wayne Schubert
    Professor Wayne Schubert

    August 30, 2013

    The van den Heever Group

    Congratulations to Associate Professor Sue van den Heever who was selected by ATS students as this year's recipient of the department's Outstanding Professor Award. The award was announced at the fall department picnic. Sue is the first member of the ATS faculty to receive this award twice. Below is a selection of student comments on Sue.

    "Sue's ability to communicate the essential details without clouding understanding with complexity is unique. She is the master of her lectures and actively engages even the students who are most reluctant to provide an opinion. Her dedication to research, collaboration, and the science is admirable."

    "She teaches with enthusiasm and creates a dynamic atmosphere in the class with discussions and debates. I always look forward to her classes."

    "She did an amazing job teaching this class. She was so helpful and encouraging."

    "Sue focuses her teaching on the latest research for a particular topic of study within the course. She facilitates critical thinking and discussion, teaching students to always question and to think like a researcher. This is a crucial, valuable skill that is not often taught in courses. Sue is a fantastic teacher not only in this aspect but also in her ability to clearly explain concepts. She is very deserving of Professor of the Year."

    Congratulations Sue!

    August 6th-8th, 2013

    CMMAP Summer 2013 Interns present the work they have been researching all summer.

    View their posters
    See the Summer 2013 Interns

    August 2013

    Welcome New Incoming Students

    New students for 2013
    Jordan Allen
    Stephen D'Andrea
    Aryeh Drager
    Caitlin Fine
    Peter Goble
    Doesken Nolan
    Alexander Goodman
    Gregory Herman
    Noel Hilliard
    Jack Kodros
    Leah Lindsey
    Chengji Liu
    Landan MacDonald
    Andrew Manaster
    Peter Marinescu
    Marie Mcgraw
    Alexandra Naegele
    Erik Nielsen
    Kimiko Sakamoto
    Robert Tournay
    Jake Zaragoza

    July 17, 2013

    Colorado State University graduate students Alex Gonzalez and Nick Davis received Best Student Paper Awards at the AMS 19th Conference on Atmospheric and Ocean Fluid Dynamics.

    Alex's paper, written with CSU coauthor Gabriela Mora Rojas, was entitled "Deep and Shallow Hadley Circulations."

    Nick's paper, written with CSU coauthor Thomas Birner, was entitled "The width of the tropical belt on seasonal to multi-decadal timescales."

    July 2013

    Congratulations to the following Fall 2013 Incoming ATS Students who earned 2013 AMS Graduate Fellowships:

    Aryeh J. Drager (advisor, Prof. van den Heever)
    Caitlin M. Fine (advisor, Prof. Johnson)
    Peter J. Marinescu (advisors, Profs. Kreidenweis and van den Heever)
    Erik R. Nielsen (advisor, Prof. Schumacher)

    The AMS Fellowship Program is a source of scholarships, useful resources, and unique opportunities for outstanding students looking to pursue graduate education in the atmospheric or related sciences. To date, 286 students have been designated as AMS fellowship recipients. The program helps these first-year graduate students to be educated about unique challenges facing the world, so that they may better tackle these real-world issues after graduation. With fellowships come several benefits, including financial support to maintain a full course load over their first year of graduate study, the opportunity to be special guests at the AMS Annual Meeting and exclusive events therein, a unique tour of several agencies in the Washington DC area, and ongoing academic and career advocation and support from AMS.

    June 15, 2013

    Doug Stolz captures some amazing photos of the lightning storm adjacent to the Department of Atmospheric Science on June 15, 2013. Click on the images for the high resolution versions.

    Photos courtesy of Doug Stolz

    May 24, 2013

    Ali Boris wins Outstanding Student Presentation Award at the 6th International Conference on Fog, Fog Collection, and Dew in Yokohama, Japan.

    Ph.D. student Ali Boris was selected to receive an outstanding student presentation award for her oral presentation at the 6th International Conference on Fog, Fog Collection, and Dew. The meeting was held May 20-24 in Yokohama, Japan. Ali's presentation was entitled Validating the formation of aqueous processing secondary organic aerosol: observations of matrix effects in authentic atmospheric waters. Ali's adviser is Jeff Collett. Her research is supported by the National Science Foundation.

    Ali's presentation [PDF]

    May 22, 2013

    CSU Professor Russ Schumacher in the news for Tornado study

    Russ Schumacher was about 45 miles from Moore, Okla., working on the science of predicting extreme weather, when the tornado hit Monday afternoon.

    He is part of the ground team for the Mesoscale Predictability Experiment, or MPEX, where researchers from the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder are teaming with other experts to collect information in a region known as "tornado alley," which includes parts of Colorado, Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, Wyoming and New Mexico.

    Check out the complete story

    Sounding locations, 20 May 2013

    May 16, 2013

    Spring 2013 Graduates

    M.S.
    James Carpenter - Kreidenweis
    Allyson Clark - Randall
    Adam Davis - Johnson
    David Duncan - Kummerow
    Theodore Letcher - Cotton
    Clayton McGee - van den Heever
    Lauren Potter - Kreidenweis
    Gavin Roy - Vonder Haar
    Lance Vanden Boogart - Vonder Haar
    Charles Yost - Schumacher
    Ph.D.
    Daniel Jones - Ito
    Ezra Levin - Kreidenweis
    Katherine Thayer-Calder - Randall

    May 2013

    CSU Atmospheric Science graduate students Sarah Ringerud and Matt Igel have both won 2013 NASA Earth and Space Science (NESSF) fellowships. The competition for this fellowship is very competitive: NASA received 330 applications for Earth Sciences, of which 56 were awarded fellowships (a mere 17% success rate).

    Matt's research proposal was entitled "Observed Environmental Influences on Convective Morphology", to be conducted under professor Sue Van Den Heever. Sarah's research proposal was entitled "Building the Foundations for a Physically Based Passive Microwave Precipitation Retrieval Over the Southern Great Plains", to be conducted under professor Christian Kummerow.

    Congratulations to both Matt and Sarah!

    May 2013

    Department of Atmospheric Science student Matthew Igel and Postdoctoral Fellow Shunsuke (Shun) Nakao have been made 2013-2014 CSU Global Sustainability Leadership Fellows. SoGES Global Sustainability Leadership Fellows are a select group of leading CSU senior Ph.D. candidates and Postdoctoral fellows interested in communicating their science to media and the public. Over the course of one year, SoGES Leadership Fellows receive state-of-the-art training in environmental communication and professional development skills. Global Sustainability Leadership Fellows are selected on a competitive basis, including their current sustainability science research and their interest in communicating important scientific concepts to broad audiences. Congratulations to Matt & Shun!

    March 4, 2013

    Article excerpt from Today @ Colorado State:

    Tiny specs of dust particles measured in the air over the Sierra Nevada mountains, that come from as far away as the Saharan desert, are vital to precipitation development, according to a new groundbreaking study in the journal Science this week led in part by a CSU atmospheric chemist [Paul DeMott].

    Read the full article

    February 7, 2013

    Hans Verlinde, with his commemorative ATS 50th anniversary clock. Hans is an alumni of our program, M.S. 1988 and Ph.D. 1992.

    The clocks have been given to all alumni speakers who have spoken at the dept in the past year.

    Hans Verlinde and Professor Sue van den Heever

    January 11, 2013

    Richard H. Johnson receives the Verner E. Suomi Award For exquisite design of rawinsonde networks in field campaigns and insightful analysis of interactions between convective clouds and the large-scale atmospheric circulation

    The Verner E. Suomi Award is granted to individuals in recognition of highly significant technological achievement in the atmospheric or related oceanic and hydrologic sciences. The term "technological" is here used in the broadest sense; it encompasses the entire spectrum of observational, measurement, data transmission, and data analysis and synthesis methodologies. The award is in the form of a medallion. Nominations are considered by the Atmospheric Research Awards Committee in even-numbered years and by the Oceanographic Research Awards Committee in odd-numbered years, which makes recommendations for final approval by AMS Council.

    Richard H. Johnson receiving the Verner E. Suomi Award

    January 2013

    Noel Hilliard receives 1st place in student poster competition

    Noel Hilliard received 1st place in the student poster competition at the American Meteorological Society Meeting in Austin, Texas in January 2013. Noel, a senior majoring in chemistry at Mt. St. Mary College, spent summer 2012 as a CMMAP summer intern at CSU. Research during her internship was conducted with Professor Jeff Collett and Ph.D. student Katie Benedict. The title of Noel's AMS poster, based on her summer research, was "The relationship between upslope wind events and wet deposition of nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park."

    View the poster [PDF]

    December 14, 2012

    Fall 2012 Graduates

    Fall 2012 graduates
    M.S.
    Atwood, Samuel Alexander
    Berg, Ashley Ruth
    Igel Adele Marie
    Lynch, Samantha Layne
    Meyer, Tiffany Casey
    Schiferl Luke Daniel
    Thompson, Elizabeth Jennifer
    Ph.D.
    Benedict, Katherine Beem
    Dostalek, John F
    McCrary, Rachel Rose
    Seigel, Robert Brian
    Selin, Rebecca Denise
    Storer, Rachel Lynn

    December 7, 2012

    Steve Miller discusses the power outages and the recovery of power in the wake of Super Storm Sandy

    December 2012

    Aryeh Drager wins Outstanding Student Paper Award at AGU

    Aryeh Drager won an Outstanding Student Paper Award at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA in December 2012. Aryeh, recently graduated from Dartmouth College with a B.A. in Engineering Physics and minor in Applied Mathematics, and spent summer 2012 as a CMMAP summer intern at CSU. His summer research was conducted with Prof. Sue Van Den Heever and PhD student Matt Igel. The title of Aryeh's AGU poster, based on his summer research, was "CloudSat-derived Morphology of Deep Convection over Tropical Oceans."

    View the poster [PDF]

    October 23, 2012

    "Congratulations to ATS students on successfully reviving the student chapter of the American Meteorological Society in our department! The AMS Council recently approved their petition and the group's name is the FORT Collins Atmospheric ScientisTs or FORTCAST." — CoCoRaHS Oct, 2012

    Ocobert 23, 2012

    Article excerpt from Today@Colorado State:

    CSU Atmospheric Science Professor Scott Denning will be the keynote speaker at the sixth annual Colorado Global Climate Conference on Oct. 29 in the CSU Lory Student Center.

    The Colorado State University Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Process (CMMAP) sponsors the conference, which is intended for 9th-12th grade school students and their teachers.

    Read the full article at Today@Colorado State

    October 23, 2012

    A nationwide network of weather watchers, part of a program based at Colorado State University, was among four community engagement projects that were honored this month in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

    CoCoRaHS team accepts the regional award earlier this month at the National Outreach Scholarship Conference awards luncheon at the University of Alabama. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network was the 2012 western regional winner of an annual competition sponsored by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU). The four regional winners will now compete for the national title.

    Read the full article at Today@Colorado State

    October 8-12, 2012

    Students receive awards for Outstanding Student Posters at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research

    Congratulations to ATS students Christina McCluskey and Lauren Potter, who both received awards for Outstanding Student Posters at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR), held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, October 8-12, 2012. Christina's poster was entitled "Ice Nuclei Produced from Prescribed Fires in Southeastern United States," and described her analyses of field study measurements of ice nucleating particles in emissions from prescribed burning, comparing them with similar measurements in smoke from wild fires and evaluating their contributions to ambient ice nuclei concentrations. Lauren's poster was entitled, "Characterizing the Influence of Transport Variability on Aerosol Concentrations at Mauna Loa Observatory," and described her analysis of trends in ~20 years of aerosol data obtained at this free tropospheric site, emphasizing the role of long-range transport from Asia in elevating springtime aerosol concentrations. Lauren and Christina also served as student session assistants at the meeting, and are Secretary and President, respectively, of the AAAR Student Chapter at CSU.

    View Christina's poster [PDF]

    View Lauren's poster [PDF]

    DeMaria Team Wins Governor's Award for High Impact Research

    Dr. Mark DeMaria

    Dr. Mark DeMaria and his team at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), recently received the 2012 Governor's Award for High-Impact Research. Mark's team develops tools that improve forecasts of hurricane strength and intensity using satellite observations and computer simulations. Congratulations to Mark and the whole team for winning this award.

    August 27, 2012

    Richard Johnson to receive 2013 American Meteorological Society's Verner E. Suomi Award

    It was recently announced that Dick Johnson has been selected as the 2013 recipient of the American Meteorological Society's Verner E. Suomi Award. This is one of the highest honors bestowed by the society. Dick was selected in recognition of his "exquisite design of rawinsonde networks in field campaigns and insightful analysis of interactions between convective clouds and the large-scale atmospheric circulation."

    Read more at Today@Colorado State.

     
    Dick Johnson

    August 27, 2012

    Professors Sonia Kreidenweis and Sue van den Heever win COE Awards

    Congratulations to Sonia Kreidenweis and Sue van den Heever both of whom recently received prestigious awards from the CSU College of Engineering. Professor Kreidenweis was this year's recipient of the COE George T. Abell Outstanding Research Faculty Award. Professor van den Heever was one of two recipients of the COE George T. Abell Outstanding Early-Career Faculty Award. The awards were presented at the all college meeting held on 20 September.

    Congratulations to Sonia and Sue on these outstanding achievements!

    Left to right: Provost Rick Miranda, Sonia Kreidenweis, Department Head Jeff Collett and Dean Steve Abt
    Left to right: Provost Rick Miranda, Sue van den Heever, Department Head Jeff Collett and Dean Steve Abt

    August 27, 2012

    Shunsuke Nakao wins NSF postdoctoral award

    Shunsuke Nakao

    Shunsuke Nakao was recently awarded a two-year National Science Foundation Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Postdoctoral Fellowship (AGS-PRF). Shun's proposal was entitled "Hygroscopicity of aqueous secondary organic aerosol: as a function of polarity", and his project is aimed at understanding how chemical reactions occurring in cloud and fog water can potentially enhance the cloud nucleating ability of aerosol particles regenerated from drying droplets. Shun is a member of the Kreidenweis group here at CSU, and his postdoctoral studies will also involve collaborations with Prof. Barbara Turpin at Rutgers University, and Prof. Markus Petters at North Carolina State University.

    Congratulations, Shun, on winning this prestigious award.

    Starlight, 'air glow' give atmospheric scientists first peek into nighttime weather from space, September 13, 2012

    Article excerpt from Today @ Colorado State

    Colorado State University researchers discovered that a combination of starlight and the upper atmosphere's own subtle glow can help satellites see Earth's clouds on moonless nights.

    During the daytime, ultraviolet light from the sun bombards the Earth's upper atmosphere and breaks apart gaseous molecules and atoms. During the nighttime, these molecules and atoms recombine, emitting faint visible light in the process

    Read the full article at Today @ Colorado State

    September 5, 2012

    Noah Newman is featured on 9news. He is promoting Rain Gauge Week where the cocorahs group are looking to put a rain gauge in every school in Colorado.


    9 News

    August 27, 2012

    Article excerpt from Today @ Colorado State

    CSU atmospheric scientist, Thomas Birner, honored with $700,000 grant, bringing science to life.

    Last month, he taught about 40 Colorado K-12 teachers while he was dressed as the guy from the early 20th century (Frenchman Léon Teisserenc de Bort) who discovered - jointly with German Richard Assmann - the stratosphere.

    Read the full article at Today @ Colorado State

    August 24, 2012

    Russ Schumacher with Student Representative Gus Alaka

    Russ Schumacher received the 2012 Outstanding Professor of the Year Award. One recipient of the award is chosen by department students each year. Professors are selected for the award based on teaching excellence, including an ability to motivate and inspire students and for help provided in and out of the classroom.

    August 20, 2012

    Welcome to all new incoming students

    Brett Basarab, MS student, advised by Prof. Rutledge , from Middlebury College
    Erin Dagg, MS student, advised by Prof. Birner and Prof. Johnson , from Univ. of Michigan - Ann Arbor
    Anne Glanville, MS student, advised by Prof. Birner , from Univ. of Kansas
    Vandana Jha, PhD student, advised by Prof. Cotton , from Univ. of Nevada - Reno
    Jianbo Liu, MS student, advised by Prof. Kummerow , from Univ. of Wyoming
    Alyssa Matthews, MS student, advised by Prof. Rutledge , from St. Cloud State Univ.
    Annareli Morales, MS student, advised by Prof. Kreidenweis , from Univ. of Illinois - Urbana
    Robert Nelson, MS student, advised by Prof. O'Dell , from Iowa State Univ.
    John Peters, PhD student, advised by Prof. Schumacher , from Univ. of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
    Douglas Stolz, PhD student, advised by Prof. Rutledge , from Univ. of Hawaii - Manoa
    Zitely Tzompa, MS student, advised by Prof. Kreidenweis , from Metropolitan Autonomous Univ.
    Bradley Wells, MS student, advised by Prof. Collett , from Univ. of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
    Samantha Wills, MS student, advised by Prof. Thompson , from Texas A&M

    August 20, 2012

    Article excerpt from Today @ Colorado State

    Colorado State University researchers, in collaboration with Air Resource Specialists Inc., on Monday are scheduled to propose a non-partisan scientific study to examine air emissions from natural gas extraction operations in Garfield County.

    Read the full article at Today @ Colorado State

    "Professor Jeff Collett was also recently interviewed by NPR regarding the details of this project."

    August 20, 2012

    Article excerpt from Today @ Colorado State

    CSU's award-winning volunteer precipitation network has been selected as a finalist in the inaugural Jackson Hole Science Media Awards.

    Read the full article at Today @ Colorado State

    August 20, 2012

    Excerpt from the Coloradoan article by Bobby Magill

    A typical day for Wendy Ryan, who specializes in the weather you get, could involve getting a call from a lawyer who wants to find out if it was raining when someone got into a car accident last Thursday afternoon at milepost 257 on Interstate 25.

    Or she could get a call from a Coloradoan reporter who wants to know if his hunch was correct that June was really the most outrageously warm June on record in Fort Collins.

    Ryan, an associate researcher at the Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University, is the keeper and cruncher of that data and the finder of answers for a public whose water, crops and, perhaps, livelihood depends on the weather you get and the weather you expect.

    Read the full article at the Coloradoan

    August 10, 2012

    Alumni Robert Levy receives International Radiation Commission (IRC) Young Scientist Award

    Robert Levy

    At the 2012 International Radiation Symposium held in Berlin, Germany, Alumnus Rob Levy (who received his Masters from CSU in 1996), working with SSAI and the Climate & Radiation Laboratory, was awarded the International Radiation Commission (IRC) Young Scientist Award for : "Outstanding contributions to radiation studies that improve retrieval of aerosol properties and related critical climate parameters from satellite data, introducing new data analysis and interpretation to address difficult challenges." This award is given to a young scientist who has made recent noteworthy contributions to radiation studies and is regarded as having great potential to become a leading radiation scientist in the future. This award is presented by an international committee of leading and senior scientists, and is awarded only once every four years.

    August 2012

    Rob Seigel

    Rob Seigel was recently awarded a National Science Foundation Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Postdoctoral Fellowship (AGS-PRF). The primary goal of the research proposed by Rob is to investigate how aerosols modify environmental thermodynamics and cloud processes of tropical convection, thereby producing changes in the detrainment of water vapor and subsequent impacts on the vertical distribution of moisture. Rob, who is advised by Professor Susan van den Heever, plans on defending his PhD towards the end of this year. He will then move to the University of Miami early in 2013 to take up his postdoctoral position under Professor Bruce Albrecht.

    Congratulations Rob on winning this prestigious award.

    June 2012

    A recent article describing the contributions of Dr. Herbert Riehl, founder of the department of atmospheric science here at CSU, has been published in BAMS. The article was written by John M. Lewis, Matthew G. Fearon, and Harold E. Klieforth and is titled "Herbert Riehl: Intrepid and Enigmatic Scholar". You will be able to find this article in the July issue of BAMS or you can read this pdf.

    May 11, 2012

    Weather Researcher Nolan Doesken receives award for climate, water education

    Article excerpt from Today @ Colorado State:

    Nolan Doesken, a longtime weather researcher in the Department of Atmospheric Science, state climatologist and founder of CoCoRaHS, the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network, has received the 2011 President's Award from the Colorado Foundation for Water Education.

    Read the full article at Today @ Colorado State


    Older News and Announcements

    Archived News and Announcements

    Last Updated: 27 February 2017. Contact the Webmaster